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Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer database, C# for the application layer, etc) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms based on X,Y,Z reasons. The truth is any mainstream relational database engine will support your needs.

I wouldn't recommend csv filesI wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend MySqlSql Lite over csv files given only these two options. Both are lightweight, but MySqlSql Lite at least offers some database functionally. Here is a good link for what SqlLite is good for. Basically good: local storage and/or replacing CSV/custom data storage files. Not designed for: Replacing client/server SQL database engines (SqlServer, Oracle, PostgreSQL, etc).

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer database, C# for the application layer, etc) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms based on X,Y,Z reasons. The truth is any mainstream relational database engine will support your needs.

I wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend MySql Lite over csv files. Both are lightweight, but MySql Lite at least offers some database functionally.

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer database, C# for the application layer, etc) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms based on X,Y,Z reasons. The truth is any mainstream relational database engine will support your needs.

I wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend Sql Lite over csv files given only these two options. Both are lightweight, but Sql Lite at least offers some database functionally. Here is a good link for what SqlLite is good for. Basically good: local storage and/or replacing CSV/custom data storage files. Not designed for: Replacing client/server SQL database engines (SqlServer, Oracle, PostgreSQL, etc).

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

4 edited body
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Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer database, C# for the application layer, etc) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms for based on X,Y,Z subjective termsreasons.   The truth is Any main streamany mainstream relational database engine will support your needs..

I wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend MySql Lite over csv files. Both are lightweight, but MySql Lite at least offers some database functionally.

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer database, C# for the application layer, etc) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms for based on X,Y,Z subjective terms.  Any main stream relational database engine will support your needs.

I wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend MySql Lite over csv files. Both are lightweight, but MySql Lite at least offers some database functionally.

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer database, C# for the application layer, etc) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms based on X,Y,Z reasons. The truth is any mainstream relational database engine will support your needs.

I wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend MySql Lite over csv files. Both are lightweight, but MySql Lite at least offers some database functionally.

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

3 Dressed up the answer a little
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Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer dbdatabase, C# for the application layer, etc) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms for based on X,Y,Z subjective terms. Any main stream relational database engine will support your needs. Any main stream relational database engine will support your needs.

I wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend MySql Lite over csv files. Both are lightweight, but MySql Lite at least offers some database functionally.

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer db, C# for the application layer) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms for based on X,Y,Z subjective terms. Any main stream relational database engine will support your needs.

I wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend MySql Lite over csv files. Both are lightweight, but MySql Lite at least offers some database functionally.

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully.

As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft stack (SqlServer database, C# for the application layer, etc) because that is what I'm most familiar with, and would be most efficient in coding. Others may choose other platforms for based on X,Y,Z subjective terms. Any main stream relational database engine will support your needs.

I wouldn't recommend csv files because that is highly likely to become unmanageable. I would overwhelmingly recommend MySql Lite over csv files. Both are lightweight, but MySql Lite at least offers some database functionally.

I also wouldn't recommend Google Fusion Tables because I believe it'll be harder to manage as you grow. I could be wrong but that is my general experience with those types of solutions. Also Fusion Tables is an experimental app, so I would be worried about what happens if the "experiment" fails...

I wouldn't recommend NoSql because I don't think you will gain much if anything, and relational type reporting will be complicated.

2 Added more detail about Google Fusion
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