4 chg: 'usually' to 'my'
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Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

    Edit: TheMy certificate name usually matches the SQL Server's login account.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from a Windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

    Edit: The certificate name usually matches the SQL Server's login account.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from a Windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

    Edit: My certificate name usually matches the SQL Server's login account.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from a Windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

3 Comment on cert name.
source | link

Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

    Edit: The certificate name usually matches the SQL Server's login account.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from a Windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from a Windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

    Edit: The certificate name usually matches the SQL Server's login account.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from a Windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

2 grammar spelling
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Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from windowsa Windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

Tom Li- MSFT described a solution to what sounds like your problem, but his solution was for SQL Server 2008. (But just how much has the installer been improved since then?)

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/sqlserver/en-US/f009e660-503a-4569-a92d-9cc2ef790ca3/install-failure-certificate-chain-trust

Key points from his post include:

  1. This certificate is used as a mechanism to protect SQL Server's login information(including password) when using SQL authentication.

    By default this self-signed certificate should only affect the login information and only when using SQL authentication.

  2. Export the certificate and delete it by using "certmgr.msc". Then run "setup.exe" to install SQL Server 2008 again.

    You also can add this certificate to the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store to solve this issue. In order to do this, please execute:

    Certutil -Addstore -f Root <File.Cer>

  3. Run "cliconfg.exe" from a Windows run dialog to determine that you did not check "Force protocol encryption".

1
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