Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
2 replaced http://dba.stackexchange.com/ with https://dba.stackexchange.com/
source | link

"Metadata visibility" determines what objects a user can see. Basically, their own objects (login, users) or what they have permissions on (tables, code etc).

You can't hide an object that they have select/execute premission on. Simple.

What you can do if to use schemasschemas to create object groupings in SSMS to "declutter" John and Sarah's view. However, this is a poor use of schema in my opinion

"Metadata visibility" determines what objects a user can see. Basically, their own objects (login, users) or what they have permissions on (tables, code etc).

You can't hide an object that they have select/execute premission on. Simple.

What you can do if to use schemas to create object groupings in SSMS to "declutter" John and Sarah's view. However, this is a poor use of schema in my opinion

"Metadata visibility" determines what objects a user can see. Basically, their own objects (login, users) or what they have permissions on (tables, code etc).

You can't hide an object that they have select/execute premission on. Simple.

What you can do if to use schemas to create object groupings in SSMS to "declutter" John and Sarah's view. However, this is a poor use of schema in my opinion

1
source | link

"Metadata visibility" determines what objects a user can see. Basically, their own objects (login, users) or what they have permissions on (tables, code etc).

You can't hide an object that they have select/execute premission on. Simple.

What you can do if to use schemas to create object groupings in SSMS to "declutter" John and Sarah's view. However, this is a poor use of schema in my opinion