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If you catch the query running in Activity Monitor (e.g. it is visible in the Processes tab and the Task State / Command are not empty), you should also see identifiable information in the Login and Host columns (this will at least tell you who is running the query and where from).

Take the value from the Session ID column and plug it into this query (I'll assume it is 57, but change that to match one of the queries you've caught):

DECLARE @spid INT = 57;

SELECT
  s.program_name,
  s.host_name,
  s.login_name,
  c.client_net_address
FROM sys.dm_exec_connections AS c
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_exec_sessions AS s
ON c.most_recent_session_id = s.session_id;

This should give you more clues about what is doing this, but it seems from a quick search that this query in fact does come from Red Gate's SQL Doc. So, someone on your team must be using that (or the SQL Server instance is exposed to the outside world, and someone not on your team is using it).

If you catch the query running in Activity Monitor (e.g. it is visible in the Processes tab and the Task State / Command are not empty), you should also see identifiable information in the Login and Host columns (this will at least tell you who is running the query and where from).

Take the value from the Session ID column and plug it into this query (I'll assume it is 57, but change that to match one of the queries you've caught):

DECLARE @spid INT = 57;

SELECT
  s.program_name,
  s.host_name,
  s.login_name,
  c.client_net_address
FROM sys.dm_exec_connections AS c
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_exec_sessions AS s
ON c.most_recent_session_id = s.session_id;

This should give you more clues about what is doing this, but it seems from a quick search that this query in fact does come from Red Gate's SQL Doc.

If you catch the query running in Activity Monitor (e.g. it is visible in the Processes tab and the Task State / Command are not empty), you should also see identifiable information in the Login and Host columns (this will at least tell you who is running the query and where from).

Take the value from the Session ID column and plug it into this query (I'll assume it is 57, but change that to match one of the queries you've caught):

DECLARE @spid INT = 57;

SELECT
  s.program_name,
  s.host_name,
  s.login_name,
  c.client_net_address
FROM sys.dm_exec_connections AS c
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_exec_sessions AS s
ON c.most_recent_session_id = s.session_id;

This should give you more clues about what is doing this, but it seems from a quick search that this query in fact does come from Red Gate's SQL Doc. So, someone on your team must be using that (or the SQL Server instance is exposed to the outside world, and someone not on your team is using it).

1
source | link

If you catch the query running in Activity Monitor (e.g. it is visible in the Processes tab and the Task State / Command are not empty), you should also see identifiable information in the Login and Host columns (this will at least tell you who is running the query and where from).

Take the value from the Session ID column and plug it into this query (I'll assume it is 57, but change that to match one of the queries you've caught):

DECLARE @spid INT = 57;

SELECT
  s.program_name,
  s.host_name,
  s.login_name,
  c.client_net_address
FROM sys.dm_exec_connections AS c
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_exec_sessions AS s
ON c.most_recent_session_id = s.session_id;

This should give you more clues about what is doing this, but it seems from a quick search that this query in fact does come from Red Gate's SQL Doc.