3 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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If I'm not mistaken, the fingerprint is a hexadecimal number. That means you could store it as a binary number, since two hexadecimal characters can be represented by a single byte, making a 32-character hexadecimal string = 16 bytes.

Here's the documentation on binary and varbinary data types for MySQL 5.7 (I don't have a test environment handy).

I do something similar for IP addresses based on this question and answer from StackExchangethis question and answer from StackExchange. Store the data as binary, convert it back to text when it needs to be displayed or compared against another string. Create a view that calls the functions as a part of it so you can easily get and store the full string when you want it.

Also, public keys are indeed public, and are often stored in searchable databases like this one.

If I'm not mistaken, the fingerprint is a hexadecimal number. That means you could store it as a binary number, since two hexadecimal characters can be represented by a single byte, making a 32-character hexadecimal string = 16 bytes.

Here's the documentation on binary and varbinary data types for MySQL 5.7 (I don't have a test environment handy).

I do something similar for IP addresses based on this question and answer from StackExchange. Store the data as binary, convert it back to text when it needs to be displayed or compared against another string. Create a view that calls the functions as a part of it so you can easily get and store the full string when you want it.

Also, public keys are indeed public, and are often stored in searchable databases like this one.

If I'm not mistaken, the fingerprint is a hexadecimal number. That means you could store it as a binary number, since two hexadecimal characters can be represented by a single byte, making a 32-character hexadecimal string = 16 bytes.

Here's the documentation on binary and varbinary data types for MySQL 5.7 (I don't have a test environment handy).

I do something similar for IP addresses based on this question and answer from StackExchange. Store the data as binary, convert it back to text when it needs to be displayed or compared against another string. Create a view that calls the functions as a part of it so you can easily get and store the full string when you want it.

Also, public keys are indeed public, and are often stored in searchable databases like this one.

2 added 7 characters in body; deleted 2 characters in body
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If I'm not mistaken, the fingerprint is a hexadecimal number. That means you could store it as a binary number, since eachtwo hexadecimal charactercharacters can be represented by 2 bytesa single byte, making a 32-character hexadecimal string = 6416 bytes.

Here's the documentation on binary and varbinary data types for MySQL 5.7 (I don't have a test environment handy).

I do something similar for IP addresses based on this question and answer from StackExchange. Store the data as binary, convert it back to text when it needs to be displayed or compared against another string. Create a view that calls the functions as a part of it so you can easily get and store the full string when you want it.

Also, public keys are indeed public, and are often stored in searchable databases like this one.

If I'm not mistaken, the fingerprint is a hexadecimal number. That means you could store it as a binary number, since each hexadecimal character can be represented by 2 bytes, making a 32-character hexadecimal string = 64 bytes.

Here's the documentation on binary and varbinary data types for MySQL 5.7 (I don't have a test environment handy).

I do something similar for IP addresses based on this question and answer from StackExchange. Store the data as binary, convert it back to text when it needs to be displayed or compared against another string. Create a view that calls the functions as a part of it so you can easily get and store the full string when you want it.

Also, public keys are indeed public, and are often stored in searchable databases like this one.

If I'm not mistaken, the fingerprint is a hexadecimal number. That means you could store it as a binary number, since two hexadecimal characters can be represented by a single byte, making a 32-character hexadecimal string = 16 bytes.

Here's the documentation on binary and varbinary data types for MySQL 5.7 (I don't have a test environment handy).

I do something similar for IP addresses based on this question and answer from StackExchange. Store the data as binary, convert it back to text when it needs to be displayed or compared against another string. Create a view that calls the functions as a part of it so you can easily get and store the full string when you want it.

Also, public keys are indeed public, and are often stored in searchable databases like this one.

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source | link

If I'm not mistaken, the fingerprint is a hexadecimal number. That means you could store it as a binary number, since each hexadecimal character can be represented by 2 bytes, making a 32-character hexadecimal string = 64 bytes.

Here's the documentation on binary and varbinary data types for MySQL 5.7 (I don't have a test environment handy).

I do something similar for IP addresses based on this question and answer from StackExchange. Store the data as binary, convert it back to text when it needs to be displayed or compared against another string. Create a view that calls the functions as a part of it so you can easily get and store the full string when you want it.

Also, public keys are indeed public, and are often stored in searchable databases like this one.