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There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

According to Raghavendra

What is deadlock ?

Process A holding lock on object X and waiting for lock on Object Y. Process B holding lock on Object Y and waiting for lock on Object X. At this point the two processes are now in what's called 'deadlock' each is trying to obtain a lock on something owned by the other. They both will wait on each other forever if left in this state. One of them has to give up and release the locks they already have. Now, deadlock detector comes into picture and allow one process to success and another to rollback.

To over come deadlock, design application in such a way that any transaction UPDATE or DELETE should succeed with complete ownership on the table. Lock the table with 'SHARE UPDATE EXCLUSIVE MODE' or 'SELECT...FOR UPDATE' or 'ACCESS EXCLUSIVE MODE' and complete the transaction. In this model, deadlock detector never throw that it has hit by a EXCLUSIVE LOCK's.

To try to monitor and trace the source of the problem, follow the link below which will help you in debugging.

"Postgres deadlocks debugging guidelines, tips and tricks" - Silvio Moioli

According to Silvio Moioli :

If you have to figure out what locks were requested in some occasion, your best friend is pgAdmin III’s Tools -> Server Status window (full explanation with screenshot here).

Important things to notice are:

  • that the Activity tab lists active processes/transactions;

  • that the Locks table lists all currently active locks.

As you showed in his first screenshot.

There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

According to Raghavendra

What is deadlock ?

Process A holding lock on object X and waiting for lock on Object Y. Process B holding lock on Object Y and waiting for lock on Object X. At this point the two processes are now in what's called 'deadlock' each is trying to obtain a lock on something owned by the other. They both will wait on each other forever if left in this state. One of them has to give up and release the locks they already have. Now, deadlock detector comes into picture and allow one process to success and another to rollback.

To over come deadlock, design application in such a way that any transaction UPDATE or DELETE should succeed with complete ownership on the table. Lock the table with 'SHARE UPDATE EXCLUSIVE MODE' or 'SELECT...FOR UPDATE' or 'ACCESS EXCLUSIVE MODE' and complete the transaction. In this model, deadlock detector never throw that it has hit by a EXCLUSIVE LOCK's.

To try to monitor and trace the source of the problem, follow the link below which will help you in debugging.

"Postgres deadlocks debugging guidelines, tips and tricks" - Silvio Moioli

According to Silvio Moioli :

If you have to figure out what locks were requested in some occasion, your best friend is pgAdmin III’s Tools -> Server Status window (full explanation with screenshot here).

Important things to notice are:

  • that the Activity tab lists active processes/transactions;

  • that the Locks table lists all currently active locks.

There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

According to Raghavendra

What is deadlock ?

Process A holding lock on object X and waiting for lock on Object Y. Process B holding lock on Object Y and waiting for lock on Object X. At this point the two processes are now in what's called 'deadlock' each is trying to obtain a lock on something owned by the other. They both will wait on each other forever if left in this state. One of them has to give up and release the locks they already have. Now, deadlock detector comes into picture and allow one process to success and another to rollback.

To over come deadlock, design application in such a way that any transaction UPDATE or DELETE should succeed with complete ownership on the table. Lock the table with 'SHARE UPDATE EXCLUSIVE MODE' or 'SELECT...FOR UPDATE' or 'ACCESS EXCLUSIVE MODE' and complete the transaction. In this model, deadlock detector never throw that it has hit by a EXCLUSIVE LOCK's.

To try to monitor and trace the source of the problem, follow the link below which will help you in debugging.

"Postgres deadlocks debugging guidelines, tips and tricks" - Silvio Moioli

According to Silvio Moioli :

If you have to figure out what locks were requested in some occasion, your best friend is pgAdmin III’s Tools -> Server Status window (full explanation with screenshot here).

Important things to notice are:

  • that the Activity tab lists active processes/transactions;

  • that the Locks table lists all currently active locks.

As you showed in his first screenshot.

3 added 401 characters in body
source | link

There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

According to Raghavendra

What is deadlock ?

Process A holding lock on object X and waiting for lock on Object Y. Process B holding lock on Object Y and waiting for lock on Object X. At this point the two processes are now in what's called 'deadlock' each is trying to obtain a lock on something owned by the other. They both will wait on each other forever if left in this state. One of them has to give up and release the locks they already have. Now, deadlock detector comes into picture and allow one process to success and another to rollback.

To over come deadlock, design application in such a way that any transaction UPDATE or DELETE should succeed with complete ownership on the table. Lock the table with 'SHARE UPDATE EXCLUSIVE MODE' or 'SELECT...FOR UPDATE' or 'ACCESS EXCLUSIVE MODE' and complete the transaction. In this model, deadlock detector never throw that it has hit by a EXCLUSIVE LOCK's.

To try to monitor and trace the source of the problem, follow the link below which will help you in debugging.

"Postgres deadlocks debugging guidelines, tips and tricks" - Silvio Moioli

According to Silvio Moioli :

If you have to figure out what locks were requested in some occasion, your best friend is pgAdmin III’s Tools -> Server Status window (full explanation with screenshot here).

Important things to notice are:

  • that the Activity tab lists active processes/transactions;

  • that the Locks table lists all currently active locks.

There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

To try to monitor and trace the source of the problem, follow the link below which will help you in debugging.

"Postgres deadlocks debugging guidelines, tips and tricks" - Silvio Moioli

There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

According to Raghavendra

What is deadlock ?

Process A holding lock on object X and waiting for lock on Object Y. Process B holding lock on Object Y and waiting for lock on Object X. At this point the two processes are now in what's called 'deadlock' each is trying to obtain a lock on something owned by the other. They both will wait on each other forever if left in this state. One of them has to give up and release the locks they already have. Now, deadlock detector comes into picture and allow one process to success and another to rollback.

To over come deadlock, design application in such a way that any transaction UPDATE or DELETE should succeed with complete ownership on the table. Lock the table with 'SHARE UPDATE EXCLUSIVE MODE' or 'SELECT...FOR UPDATE' or 'ACCESS EXCLUSIVE MODE' and complete the transaction. In this model, deadlock detector never throw that it has hit by a EXCLUSIVE LOCK's.

To try to monitor and trace the source of the problem, follow the link below which will help you in debugging.

"Postgres deadlocks debugging guidelines, tips and tricks" - Silvio Moioli

According to Silvio Moioli :

If you have to figure out what locks were requested in some occasion, your best friend is pgAdmin III’s Tools -> Server Status window (full explanation with screenshot here).

Important things to notice are:

  • that the Activity tab lists active processes/transactions;

  • that the Locks table lists all currently active locks.

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source | link

There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

To try to monitor and trace the source of the problem, follow the link below which will help you in debugging.

"Postgres deadlocks debugging guidelines, tips and tricks" - Silvio Moioli

There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

There is a blog, Mr. Raghavendra, which discusses very well the subject: deadlocks in PostgreSQL. See the link below. You can better understand the process of control and locks management PostgreSQL.

"Deadlocks in PostgreSQL" - Raghavendra

To try to monitor and trace the source of the problem, follow the link below which will help you in debugging.

"Postgres deadlocks debugging guidelines, tips and tricks" - Silvio Moioli

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