2 added 13 characters in body
source | link

From the docsdocs, mysql.db is the table that handles database-specific GRANTS. That is to say, if you explicitly indicated a database in your GRANT command, it would show up in this table:

GRANT SELECT, INSERT ON foo.* TO `bar`@`localhost`;

So the user bar@localhost would have SELECT and INSERT marked as 'Y' in the mysql.db table.

To remove entries from this table, likewise you need to specify the database:

REVOKE SELECT, INSERT ON foo.* FROM `bar`@`localhost`;

Issuing a REVOKE INSERT ON *.* statement (all databases) will not affect this table.

Also, a DROP USER statement will clean up all the entries in the various mysql.* tables that deal with user authentication, such as mysql.db.

From the docs, mysql.db is the table that handles database-specific GRANTS. That is to say, if you explicitly indicated a database in your GRANT command, it would show up in this table:

GRANT SELECT, INSERT ON foo.* TO `bar`@`localhost`;

So the user bar@localhost would have SELECT and INSERT marked as 'Y' in the mysql.db table.

To remove entries from this table, likewise you need to specify the database:

REVOKE SELECT, INSERT ON foo.* FROM `bar`@`localhost`;

Issuing a REVOKE INSERT ON *.* statement (all databases) will not affect this table.

Also, a DROP USER statement will clean up all the entries in the various mysql.* tables that deal with user authentication, such as mysql.db.

From the docs, mysql.db is the table that handles database-specific GRANTS. That is to say, if you explicitly indicated a database in your GRANT command, it would show up in this table:

GRANT SELECT, INSERT ON foo.* TO `bar`@`localhost`;

So the user bar@localhost would have SELECT and INSERT marked as 'Y' in the mysql.db table.

To remove entries from this table, likewise you need to specify the database:

REVOKE SELECT, INSERT ON foo.* FROM `bar`@`localhost`;

Issuing a REVOKE INSERT ON *.* statement (all databases) will not affect this table.

Also, a DROP USER statement will clean up all the entries in the various mysql.* tables that deal with user authentication, such as mysql.db.

1
source | link

From the docs, mysql.db is the table that handles database-specific GRANTS. That is to say, if you explicitly indicated a database in your GRANT command, it would show up in this table:

GRANT SELECT, INSERT ON foo.* TO `bar`@`localhost`;

So the user bar@localhost would have SELECT and INSERT marked as 'Y' in the mysql.db table.

To remove entries from this table, likewise you need to specify the database:

REVOKE SELECT, INSERT ON foo.* FROM `bar`@`localhost`;

Issuing a REVOKE INSERT ON *.* statement (all databases) will not affect this table.

Also, a DROP USER statement will clean up all the entries in the various mysql.* tables that deal with user authentication, such as mysql.db.