2 fixed typos
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If there is an indexonindex on a search predicate, it might be used for range locks.

I.e., lock from fistfirst row to next in range. And from that next to third row, etc. Up to the last row in the range. So essentially a number of row locks, but it blocks the range from inserts also for "in-between" values (locking the range).

For this to happen you (SQL Server) need to have an index to work with. Without indexes to do the locking in (indexes on predicates), you'll (from what I know) will get table locks.

If there is an indexon a search predicate, it might be used for range locks.

I.e., lock from fist row to next in range. And that next to third row, etc. Up to the last row in the range. So essentially a number of row locks, but it blocks the range from inserts also for "in-between" values (locking the range).

For this to happen you (SQL Server) need to have an index to work with. Without indexes to do the locking in (indexes on predicates), you'll (from what I know) will get table locks.

If there is an index on a search predicate, it might be used for range locks.

I.e., lock from first row to next in range. And from that next to third row, etc. Up to the last row in the range. So essentially a number of row locks, but it blocks the range from inserts also for "in-between" values (locking the range).

For this to happen you (SQL Server) need to have an index to work with. Without indexes to do the locking in (indexes on predicates), you'll (from what I know) will get table locks.

1
source | link

If there is an indexon a search predicate, it might be used for range locks.

I.e., lock from fist row to next in range. And that next to third row, etc. Up to the last row in the range. So essentially a number of row locks, but it blocks the range from inserts also for "in-between" values (locking the range).

For this to happen you (SQL Server) need to have an index to work with. Without indexes to do the locking in (indexes on predicates), you'll (from what I know) will get table locks.