4 Put points in bullet points instead of separated by commas, moved link up. Removed 'clustered index' . moved networking to 'transport' section with SSIS
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Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the source:

  • logical and physical fragmentation
  • locking/blocking
  • disk architecture
  • How much data is being pushed through.

logical and physical fragmentationThen on the (clustered index being fragmented), locking/blocking, disk architecture, network bandwidth/quality, How muchtransport layer of the data is being pushed through./package you need to see:

  • network bandwidth/quality

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table can handleis properly setup for that. http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination: Networking, DiskIO, blocking/locking, bad clustering key on the destination:

  • DiskIO

  • blocking/locking

  • bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the source:

logical and physical fragmentation (clustered index being fragmented), locking/blocking, disk architecture, network bandwidth/quality, How much data is being pushed through.

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table can handle that.

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination: Networking, DiskIO, blocking/locking, bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the source:

  • logical and physical fragmentation
  • locking/blocking
  • disk architecture
  • How much data is being pushed through.

Then on the transport layer of the data/package you need to see:

  • network bandwidth/quality

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table is properly setup for that. http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination:

  • DiskIO

  • blocking/locking

  • bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

3 Bolded the text 'on the source'.
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Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the sourceon the source:

logical and physical fragmentation (clustered index being fragmented), locking/blocking, disk architecture, network bandwidth/quality, How much data is being pushed through.

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table can handle that.

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination: Networking, DiskIO, blocking/locking, bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the source:

logical and physical fragmentation (clustered index being fragmented), locking/blocking, disk architecture, network bandwidth/quality, How much data is being pushed through.

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table can handle that.

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination: Networking, DiskIO, blocking/locking, bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the source:

logical and physical fragmentation (clustered index being fragmented), locking/blocking, disk architecture, network bandwidth/quality, How much data is being pushed through.

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table can handle that.

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination: Networking, DiskIO, blocking/locking, bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

2 added 6 characters in body
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Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the source: logical

logical and physical fragmentation (clustered index being fragmented) locking, locking/blocking disk, disk architecture network, network bandwidth/quality How, How much data is being pushed through.

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table can handle that.

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination: Networking, DiskIO, blocking/locking, bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the source: logical and physical fragmentation (clustered index being fragmented) locking/blocking disk architecture network bandwidth/quality How much data is being pushed through

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table can handle that.

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination: Networking DiskIO blocking/locking bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

Can you please post the schema of the source and destination tables? How wide are the rows and are the clustered index keys identical? 5 hours could or could not be optimal, it really depends on:

How fast it can read the data from the source Some factors that affect this are read performance hits on the source:

logical and physical fragmentation (clustered index being fragmented), locking/blocking, disk architecture, network bandwidth/quality, How much data is being pushed through.

The SSIS package then would try to use bulk inserts assuming your table can handle that.

Then you'd be confined to the weakest link on the destination: Networking, DiskIO, blocking/locking, bad clustering key

You should clear and analyze your waitstats, view the wait stats associated with the load queries, and also read into how to speed up SSIS packages from some blogs such as: http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/reporting-services/using-sql-server-integration-services-to-bulk-load-data/

http://henkvandervalk.com/speeding-up-ssis-bulk-inserts-into-sql-server

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