3 edited tags
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2 Replace missing variable with correct one
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$Database = $Server.Databases[$DatabaseName]

$Table = @($Database.Tables[$TableName, $TableSchemaName])

$ReferencingTables = $Database.Tables.ForeignKeys |
    ? { $_.ReferencedTable -eq $TableName -and $_.ReferencedTableSchema -eq $TableSchemaName } |
    % { $ForeignKeysToTable$_.Parent } | Sort ID | Get-Unique

$TablesToArchive = $Table + $ReferencingTables

$ObjectsToArchive = $TablesToArchive + $TablesToArchive.Indexes + $TablesToArchive.ForeignKeys
$Database = $Server.Databases[$DatabaseName]

$Table = @($Database.Tables[$TableName, $TableSchemaName])

$ReferencingTables = $Database.Tables.ForeignKeys |
    ? { $_.ReferencedTable -eq $TableName -and $_.ReferencedTableSchema -eq $TableSchemaName } |
    % { $ForeignKeysToTable.Parent } | Sort ID | Get-Unique

$TablesToArchive = $Table + $ReferencingTables

$ObjectsToArchive = $TablesToArchive + $TablesToArchive.Indexes + $TablesToArchive.ForeignKeys
$Database = $Server.Databases[$DatabaseName]

$Table = @($Database.Tables[$TableName, $TableSchemaName])

$ReferencingTables = $Database.Tables.ForeignKeys |
    ? { $_.ReferencedTable -eq $TableName -and $_.ReferencedTableSchema -eq $TableSchemaName } |
    % { $_.Parent } | Sort ID | Get-Unique

$TablesToArchive = $Table + $ReferencingTables

$ObjectsToArchive = $TablesToArchive + $TablesToArchive.Indexes + $TablesToArchive.ForeignKeys
    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackDBAs/status/281565226439147521
1
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Why am I missing some output?

Archiving to avoid ID Exhaustion

We are about to run out of IDs in one of the tables of our OLTP logging system. It's my job to find a way to 'archive' the existing row data in the full table and in all referring tables so that we can continue to log new data into the tables.

The quickest way for us to archive data in one table is simply to rename the target table and all dependent objects -- junction tables, indexes, constraints. It's fast and keeps the data intact. To finish the job, we have to create new, empty copies of all the objects with their old names. If we do all these operations in one transaction, the stored procedures that insert new data will not fail because of missing tables.

An attempt to solve using PowerShell

I've putting together a PowerShell script to generate a T-SQL script to perform the archive operation.

The script is not generating as many rename statements as it should, and I don't understand why.

The script loads SMO, sets the names of target objects, and sets up a capture-only connection to the server - this is so I can capture rename commands for inspection later:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91";

$ServerName = 'CLOUDCORP\LOGGING'
$DatabaseName = 'Logging'
$TableName = 'tbDataRequests'
$TableSchemaName = 'Logging'

$Server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $ServerName
$Server.ConnectionContext.SqlExecutionModes = [Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlExecutionModes]::CaptureSql

Next it creates an array of objects that are going to be archived by renaming. The target table itself, all referencing tables, and all keys and all indexes of these tables are to be archived:

$Database = $Server.Databases[$DatabaseName]

$Table = @($Database.Tables[$TableName, $TableSchemaName])

$ReferencingTables = $Database.Tables.ForeignKeys |
    ? { $_.ReferencedTable -eq $TableName -and $_.ReferencedTableSchema -eq $TableSchemaName } |
    % { $ForeignKeysToTable.Parent } | Sort ID | Get-Unique

$TablesToArchive = $Table + $ReferencingTables

$ObjectsToArchive = $TablesToArchive + $TablesToArchive.Indexes + $TablesToArchive.ForeignKeys

The problem part is next. For each object to archive, I try to capture a rename statement.

$ObjectsToArchive | % { $_.Rename($_.Name + '_archive') }
$RenameCommands = $Server.ConnectionContext.CapturedSql.Text

Unexpected output

After running this against my database, the array $ObjectsToArchive contains 48 items. The expression $objectsToArchive.Name produces a list like this:

tbDataRequests
tbDataRequestPenguinServers
tbDataRequestLegs
tbDataRequestPaidDataRequests
tbDataRequestResponses
tbDataRequestUUIDMappings
tbDataRequestRouteNodes
tbRequestDataRequestQ
tbRequestDataRequests
IX_DataRequests_DataRequestDT
PK_DataRequests
PK_DataRequestPenguinServers
PK_DataRequestLegs
IX_DataRequestPaidDataRequests_PaidDataRequestID
PK_DataRequestPaidDataRequests
IX_DataRequestResponses_ScrapeResponseID
PK_DataRequestResponses
IX_DataRequestUUIDMappings_DataRequestID
PK_DataRequestUUIDMappings
PK_Geo_DataRequestRouteNodes
IX_RequestDataRequestQ_FK_RequestUUIDID
PK_RequestDataRequestQ
IX_RequestDataRequests_DataRequestID
PK_RequestDataRequests
FK_DataRequests_OrderType_OrderTypeID
FK_DataRequests_DatePairs_DatePairID
FK_DataRequests_CustomerCounts_CustomerCountID
FK_DataRequests_Routes_RouteID
FK_DataRequests_DataClients_DataClientID
FK_DataRequests_UserCountries_UserCountryID
FK_DataRequests_Websites_WebsiteID
FK_DataRequestPenguinServers_PenguinServers_JacqiardServerID
FK_DataRequestPenguinServers_DataRequests_DataRequestID
FK_DataRequestLegs_DatePairs_DatePairID
FK_DataRequestLegs_LegTypes_LegTypeID
FK_DataRequestLegs_Routes_RouteID
FK_DataRequestLegs_DataRequests_DataRequestID
FK_DataRequestPaidDataRequests_PaidDataRequests_PaidDataRequestID
FK_DataRequestPaidDataRequests_DataRequests_DataRequestID
FK_DataRequestResponses_DataRequests_DataRequestID
FK_DataRequestResponses_ScrapeResponses_ScrapeResponseID
FK_DataRequestUUIDMappings_DataRequests_DataRequestID
FK_DataRequestUUIDMappings_DataRequestUUIDs_Scrape RequestUUIDID
FK_Geo_DataRequestRouteNodes_DataRequests_DataRequestID
FK_RequestDataRequestQ_RequestUUIDs_RequestUUIDID
FK_RequestDataRequestQ_DataRequests_DataRequestID
FK_RequestDataRequests_Requests_RequestID
FK_RequestDataRequests_DataRequests_RequestID

There should be one rename statement for every object in this array. However, the CapturedSql property contains only 10 rename statements. The expression $RenameCommands | ? { $_ -like '*sp_rename*' } produces a list like this:

EXEC dbo.sp_rename @objname = N'[Logging].[tbDataRequests]', @newname = N'tbDataRequests_archive', @objtype = N'OBJECT'
EXEC sp_rename N'[Logging].[tbDataRequests].[IX_DataRequests_DataRequestDT]', N'IX_DataRequests_DataRequestDT_archive', N'INDEX'
EXEC sp_rename N'[Logging].[tbDataRequests].[PK_DataRequests]', N'PK_DataRequests_archive', N'INDEX'
EXEC sp_rename N'[FK_DataRequests_OrderType_OrderTypeID]', N'FK_DataRequests_OrderType_OrderTypeID_archive', N'OBJECT'
EXEC sp_rename N'[FK_DataRequests_DatePairs_DatePairID]', N'FK_DataRequests_DatePairs_DatePairID_archive', N'OBJECT'
EXEC sp_rename N'[FK_DataRequests_CustomerCounts_CustomerCountID]', N'FK_DataRequests_CustomerCounts_CustomerCountID_archive', N'OBJECT'
EXEC sp_rename N'[FK_DataRequests_Routes_RouteID]', N'FK_DataRequests_Routes_RouteID_archive', N'OBJECT'
EXEC sp_rename N'[FK_DataRequests_DataClients_DataClientID]', N'FK_DataRequests_DataClients_DataClientID_archive', N'OBJECT'
EXEC sp_rename N'[FK_DataRequests_UserCountries_UserCountryID]', N'FK_DataRequests_UserCountries_UserCountryID_archive', N'OBJECT'
EXEC sp_rename N'[FK_DataRequests_Websites_WebsiteID]', N'FK_DataRequests_Websites_WebsiteID_archive', N'OBJECT'

It's scripting out rename statements for Logging.tbDataRequests and its keys and indexes, but not for any of the other objects.

What am I doing wrong here?