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You are lost on Auto Growautogrow, you are lost on File Groupsfilegroups. For your own sake, I hope this is not a production DB.

Having said that - here is how the DB spacing works:

Execute this in SQL Server Management Studio

sp_helpdb <yourdbname>

This should give you 2 sets of output.The first has a column called db_sizedb_size, which will give you the current DB size. The second will give you independent sizes of you data and log files. Check the column here called maxsizemaxsize.

Now execute this:

USE <yourDB>
GO

EXECUTE sp_spaceused
GO

The output of this query will tell you the unallocated space, or free space available in your DB file. When this fills up, your DB will either grow or will stop, based on various settings and circumstances.

When you initially create a DB, you define what is the initial size, how does the DB grow and what is the maxsize. If you create a DB with 3 GB initial size, unlimited growth on a HDD with 100 GB free space, the DB will continue growing, after the initial 3 GB is consumed, till it fills up all the available free space in your hard discdisk. However, if you create a DB with initial size of 1 GB and set the maximum to 3 GB, then your DB will stop when it grows to 3 GB, even if the HDD has another zillion TB of free space. 

Please do not change the recovery model to simple if this is production. You will lose the ability to recover to a point in time.

No matter what you do - Step 1 : BACKUP YOUR DB

Raj

You are lost on Auto Grow, you are lost on File Groups. For your own sake, I hope this is not a production DB.

Having said that - here is how the DB spacing works:

Execute this in SQL Server Management Studio

sp_helpdb <yourdbname>

This should give you 2 sets of output.The first has a column called db_size, which will give you the current DB size. The second will give you independent sizes of you data and log files. Check the column here called maxsize.

Now execute this:

USE <yourDB>
GO

EXECUTE sp_spaceused
GO

The output of this query will tell you the unallocated space, or free space available in your DB file. When this fills up, your DB will either grow or will stop, based on various settings and circumstances.

When you initially create a DB, you define what is the initial size, how does the DB grow and what is the maxsize. If you create a DB with 3 GB initial size, unlimited growth on a HDD with 100 GB free space, the DB will continue growing, after the initial 3 GB is consumed, till it fills up all the available free space in your hard disc. However, if you create a DB with initial size of 1 GB and set the maximum to 3 GB, then your DB will stop when it grows to 3 GB, even if the HDD has another zillion TB of free space. Please do not change the recovery model to simple if this is production. You will lose the ability to recover to a point in time.

No matter what you do - Step 1 : BACKUP YOUR DB

Raj

You are lost on autogrow, you are lost on filegroups. For your own sake, I hope this is not a production DB.

Having said that - here is how the DB spacing works:

Execute this in SQL Server Management Studio

sp_helpdb <yourdbname>

This should give you 2 sets of output.The first has a column called db_size, which will give you the current DB size. The second will give you independent sizes of you data and log files. Check the column here called maxsize.

Now execute this:

USE <yourDB>
GO

EXECUTE sp_spaceused
GO

The output of this query will tell you the unallocated space, or free space available in your DB file. When this fills up, your DB will either grow or will stop, based on various settings and circumstances.

When you initially create a DB, you define what is the initial size, how does the DB grow and what is the maxsize. If you create a DB with 3 GB initial size, unlimited growth on a HDD with 100 GB free space, the DB will continue growing, after the initial 3 GB is consumed, till it fills up all the available free space in your disk. However, if you create a DB with initial size of 1 GB and set the maximum to 3 GB, then your DB will stop when it grows to 3 GB, even if the HDD has another zillion TB of free space. 

Please do not change the recovery model to simple if this is production. You will lose the ability to recover to a point in time.

No matter what you do - Step 1 : BACKUP YOUR DB

1
source | link

You are lost on Auto Grow, you are lost on File Groups. For your own sake, I hope this is not a production DB.

Having said that - here is how the DB spacing works:

Execute this in SQL Server Management Studio

sp_helpdb <yourdbname>

This should give you 2 sets of output.The first has a column called db_size, which will give you the current DB size. The second will give you independent sizes of you data and log files. Check the column here called maxsize.

Now execute this:

USE <yourDB>
GO

EXECUTE sp_spaceused
GO

The output of this query will tell you the unallocated space, or free space available in your DB file. When this fills up, your DB will either grow or will stop, based on various settings and circumstances.

When you initially create a DB, you define what is the initial size, how does the DB grow and what is the maxsize. If you create a DB with 3 GB initial size, unlimited growth on a HDD with 100 GB free space, the DB will continue growing, after the initial 3 GB is consumed, till it fills up all the available free space in your hard disc. However, if you create a DB with initial size of 1 GB and set the maximum to 3 GB, then your DB will stop when it grows to 3 GB, even if the HDD has another zillion TB of free space. Please do not change the recovery model to simple if this is production. You will lose the ability to recover to a point in time.

No matter what you do - Step 1 : BACKUP YOUR DB

Raj