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You can use Windows System Resource Manager (WSRM), which is a feature in Windows Server (not sure of minimum version, but definitely 2008 R2+).

This will allow you to control the amount of CPU used by a process, so if you hadn't already separated out the rogue application to its own SQL Server instance, you would have had do that anyway.

At that point you can seeset whatever MAXDOP you want, as the process will never exceed the maximum limits you set in WSRM.


Setting the CPU affinity mask is an option. You'd want to completely isolate the application onto its own set of cores to eliminate contention (note: watch your NUMA nodes). If you have those extra cores available, then go for it, but I'd prefer the WSRM solution because when that application is idle, all the CPUs can be used by other applications.

You can use Windows System Resource Manager (WSRM), which is a feature in Windows Server (not sure of minimum version, but definitely 2008 R2+).

This will allow you to control the amount of CPU used by a process, so if you hadn't already separated out the rogue application to its own instance, you would have had do that anyway.

At that point you can see whatever MAXDOP you want, as the process will never exceed the maximum limits you set in WSRM.

You can use Windows System Resource Manager (WSRM), which is a feature in Windows Server (not sure of minimum version, but definitely 2008 R2+).

This will allow you to control the amount of CPU used by a process, so if you hadn't already separated out the rogue application to its own SQL Server instance, you would have had do that anyway.

At that point you can set whatever MAXDOP you want, as the process will never exceed the maximum limits you set in WSRM.


Setting the CPU affinity mask is an option. You'd want to completely isolate the application onto its own set of cores to eliminate contention (note: watch your NUMA nodes). If you have those extra cores available, then go for it, but I'd prefer the WSRM solution because when that application is idle, all the CPUs can be used by other applications.

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source | link

You can use Windows System Resource Manager (WSRM), which is a feature in Windows Server (not sure of minimum version, but definitely 2008 R2+).

This will allow you to control the amount of CPU used by a process, so if you hadn't already separated out the rogue application to its own instance, you would have had do that anyway.

At that point you can see whatever MAXDOP you want, as the process will never exceed the maximum limits you set in WSRM.