5 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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You can connect to SQL Server using the Dedicated Administrator Connection (DAC) then view the sql text of the stored procedure. Connect to the DAC using:

admin:Your_Servername

You can find the full steps needed in this answer on Stack Overflowthis answer on Stack Overflow by Martin Smith.

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

You can connect to SQL Server using the Dedicated Administrator Connection (DAC) then view the sql text of the stored procedure. Connect to the DAC using:

admin:Your_Servername

You can find the full steps needed in this answer on Stack Overflow by Martin Smith.

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

You can connect to SQL Server using the Dedicated Administrator Connection (DAC) then view the sql text of the stored procedure. Connect to the DAC using:

admin:Your_Servername

You can find the full steps needed in this answer on Stack Overflow by Martin Smith.

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

4 replaced http://dba.stackexchange.com/ with https://dba.stackexchange.com/
source | link

You can connect to SQL Server using the Dedicated Administrator Connection (DAC) then view the sql text of the stored procedure. Connect to the DAC using:

admin:Your_Servername

You can find the full steps needed in this answer on Stack Overflow by Martin SmithMartin Smith.

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

You can connect to SQL Server using the Dedicated Administrator Connection (DAC) then view the sql text of the stored procedure. Connect to the DAC using:

admin:Your_Servername

You can find the full steps needed in this answer on Stack Overflow by Martin Smith.

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

You can connect to SQL Server using the Dedicated Administrator Connection (DAC) then view the sql text of the stored procedure. Connect to the DAC using:

admin:Your_Servername

You can find the full steps needed in this answer on Stack Overflow by Martin Smith.

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

3 Incorporated Martin Smith's comment
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You can connect to sql serverSQL Server using the Dedicated Administrator Connection (DAC) and then view the sql text of the stored procedure. Connect to the DAC using:

admin:Your_Servername

You can find the full steps needed in this answer on Stack Overflow by Martin Smith.

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

You can connect to sql server using DAC and then view the sql text of the stored procedure.

admin:Your_Servername

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

You can connect to SQL Server using the Dedicated Administrator Connection (DAC) then view the sql text of the stored procedure. Connect to the DAC using:

admin:Your_Servername

You can find the full steps needed in this answer on Stack Overflow by Martin Smith.

Another alternative is to use some third party scripts as mentioned in Decrypting encrypted stored procedures, views, functions in SQL Server 2005, 2008, & R2

As a side note - if it is a third party database and if you do it on prod, will the vendor support it? There may be a good reason to encrypt the SPs or views. It's probably better to take a backup, and then fiddle with that.

2 added abbreviation for DAC
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