5 added 329 characters in body
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And how many angels can dance around the head of a pin?

The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

  • Table = Relation

  • Row = Tuple

  • Column = Attribute

  • Domain = Data Type

See the Wikipedia entry on relational databases here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to pilots/flight-attendants, engineers or marketing.

  • pilots/attendants: a "flight" was out and back from base (i.e. two take-offs and two landings),
  • engineers: one take-off and landone landing, could be test, repair, training (i.e. one airport back to the same airport) or a "leg", i.e. one airport to another - what "civilians" would normally call a flight, as in "I'm catching my flight home tomorrow"),

  • marketing: a six month (ontypically on-season/off or off-season) series of "flights" from/to a given airport in the context of a contract.

The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

And how many angels dance around the head of a pin?

The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

  • Table = Relation

  • Row = Tuple

  • Column = Attribute

  • Domain = Data Type

See here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to pilots/attendants, engineers or marketing.

  • pilots/attendants: a "flight" was out and back from base.
  • engineers: take and land, could be test, repair, training.

  • marketing: a six month (on-season/off-season) series of "flights" from/to a given airport.

The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

And how many angels can dance around the head of a pin?

The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

  • Table = Relation

  • Row = Tuple

  • Column = Attribute

  • Domain = Data Type

See the Wikipedia entry on relational databases here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to pilots/flight-attendants, engineers or marketing.

  • pilots/attendants: a "flight" was out and back from base (i.e. two take-offs and two landings),
  • engineers: one take-off and one landing, could be test, repair, training (i.e. one airport back to the same airport) or a "leg", i.e. one airport to another - what "civilians" would normally call a flight, as in "I'm catching my flight home tomorrow"),

  • marketing: a six month (typically on-season or off-season) series of "flights" from/to a given airport in the context of a contract.

The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

4 added 246 characters in body
source | link

And how many angels dance around the head of a pin? 

The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

Table = Relation

Row = Tuple

Column = Attribute

Domain = Data Type

  • Table = Relation

  • Row = Tuple

  • Column = Attribute

  • Domain = Data Type

See here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to pilots/attendants, engineers or marketing.

  • pilots/attendants: a "flight" was out and back from base.
  • engineers: take and land, could be test, repair, training.

  • marketing: a six month (on-season/off-season) series of "flights" from/to a given airport.

The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

And how many angels dance around the head of a pin? The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

Table = Relation

Row = Tuple

Column = Attribute

Domain = Data Type

See here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to pilots/attendants, engineers or marketing. The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

And how many angels dance around the head of a pin? 

The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

  • Table = Relation

  • Row = Tuple

  • Column = Attribute

  • Domain = Data Type

See here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to pilots/attendants, engineers or marketing.

  • pilots/attendants: a "flight" was out and back from base.
  • engineers: take and land, could be test, repair, training.

  • marketing: a six month (on-season/off-season) series of "flights" from/to a given airport.

The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

3 added 6 characters in body
source | link

And how many angels dance around the head of a pin? The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

Table = Relation

Row = Tuple

Column = Attribute

Domain = Data Type

See here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to flight crewpilots/attendants, engineers or marketing. The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

And how many angels dance around the head of a pin? The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

Table = Relation

Row = Tuple

Column = Attribute

Domain = Data Type

See here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to flight crew, engineers or marketing. The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

And how many angels dance around the head of a pin? The person who corrected you could themselves be corrected.

Table = Relation

Row = Tuple

Column = Attribute

Domain = Data Type

See here.

I worked for an airline and the word "flight" could be used in three different ways depending on whether you were talking to pilots/attendants, engineers or marketing. The spreadsheet analogy is more than good enough for 99.99% of cases, even in reasonably technical speech (unless one is a professor of relational algebra). Does the person who corrected you use the word "whom" correctly? 99.99% of people don't and it really doesn't matter.

2 added 13 characters in body
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