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Per Aaron Bertrand's answer (Quick look at how much RAM is allocated to SQL Server?Quick look at how much RAM is allocated to SQL Server?). Task Manager shouldn't be used to ascertain how much memory SQL is actually using.

I prefer to use the following query (Again, thanks Aaron):

SELECT object_name, cntr_value
  FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters
  WHERE counter_name IN ('Total Server Memory (KB)', 'Target Server Memory (KB)');

Alternatively, using DBCC MEMORYSTATUS will yield this information (as well as a slew of additional information).

Per Aaron Bertrand's answer (Quick look at how much RAM is allocated to SQL Server?). Task Manager shouldn't be used to ascertain how much memory SQL is actually using.

I prefer to use the following query (Again, thanks Aaron):

SELECT object_name, cntr_value
  FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters
  WHERE counter_name IN ('Total Server Memory (KB)', 'Target Server Memory (KB)');

Alternatively, using DBCC MEMORYSTATUS will yield this information (as well as a slew of additional information).

Per Aaron Bertrand's answer (Quick look at how much RAM is allocated to SQL Server?). Task Manager shouldn't be used to ascertain how much memory SQL is actually using.

I prefer to use the following query (Again, thanks Aaron):

SELECT object_name, cntr_value
  FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters
  WHERE counter_name IN ('Total Server Memory (KB)', 'Target Server Memory (KB)');

Alternatively, using DBCC MEMORYSTATUS will yield this information (as well as a slew of additional information).

2 added 5 characters in body
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Per Aaron Bertrand's answer (Quick look at how much RAM is allocated to SQL Server?). Perfmon Task Manager shouldn't be used to ascertain how much memory SQL is actually using.

I prefer to use the following query (Again, thanks Aaron):

SELECT object_name, cntr_value
  FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters
  WHERE counter_name IN ('Total Server Memory (KB)', 'Target Server Memory (KB)');

Alternatively, using DBCC MEMORYSTATUS will yield this information (as well as a slew of additional information).

Per Aaron Bertrand's answer (Quick look at how much RAM is allocated to SQL Server?). Perfmon shouldn't be used to ascertain how much memory SQL is actually using.

I prefer to use the following query (Again, thanks Aaron):

SELECT object_name, cntr_value
  FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters
  WHERE counter_name IN ('Total Server Memory (KB)', 'Target Server Memory (KB)');

Alternatively, using DBCC MEMORYSTATUS will yield this information (as well as a slew of additional information).

Per Aaron Bertrand's answer (Quick look at how much RAM is allocated to SQL Server?). Task Manager shouldn't be used to ascertain how much memory SQL is actually using.

I prefer to use the following query (Again, thanks Aaron):

SELECT object_name, cntr_value
  FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters
  WHERE counter_name IN ('Total Server Memory (KB)', 'Target Server Memory (KB)');

Alternatively, using DBCC MEMORYSTATUS will yield this information (as well as a slew of additional information).

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source | link

Per Aaron Bertrand's answer (Quick look at how much RAM is allocated to SQL Server?). Perfmon shouldn't be used to ascertain how much memory SQL is actually using.

I prefer to use the following query (Again, thanks Aaron):

SELECT object_name, cntr_value
  FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters
  WHERE counter_name IN ('Total Server Memory (KB)', 'Target Server Memory (KB)');

Alternatively, using DBCC MEMORYSTATUS will yield this information (as well as a slew of additional information).