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There's a way to calculate how many DTU's a given regular server outputs, but i need the other way around!

I'm planning on leaving the azure environment, and I need a way to measure how much CPU/Memory I should use on my RDS.
Right now I know I consume around 100 DTUs...

so, roughly speaking, which machine is capable of such output?

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This answer from SO seems to indicate it may intentionally be clouded in mystery... which makes perfect sense if you're Microsoft and very much want people to move into the cloud instead of hosting their own architecture. The cloud is where they get a much bigger slice of the $ pie, after all!

You could always default back to classic recommendations on specs based on nature of workload, size, etc. People were spec'ing VMs long before DTUs :)

Here are a few resources in this vein, though there are many more and none are all-inclusive:

Brent Ozar also offers training in this area if you really need to hit the nail on the head with this server transition (I am not affiliated with Brent Ozar Unlimited in any way).

At the end of the day, you'll probably have to do some tuning either way, so I'd start small and work my way up in a test environment. You know your application(s) and workload(s) best so you need to figure out what features and specs are going to get you to your desired state.

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100 DTU is equivalent to 1 core. It should require less than 150 IOPS in terms of storage performance.

Although the definition of DTU states that DTU is a blended measure of CPU, memory, and data I/O, however none of the performance counters used by the DTU Calculator take memory into account. This does not help us to give you the memory requirements for that 100 DTU tier.

Hope this helps.

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  • i doubt that number because there's no way a single core database performs the kind of computation it does in 10-20 ms... where talking heavy reporting load, with aggregations and other cpu intensive operations... – Leonardo Feb 19 '18 at 16:38

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