3

We have been running SQL Server 2016 for some time now but initially left the database compatibility level to SQL Server 2008 (100). Recently we did update the DB Compatibility Level to 2016 (130) but we have encountered few issues there. We managed to find one particular one where a query converting datetime to datetime2 and it returns NULL when it should have returned a value, not sure if it is CE or something? Please see the example below:

CREATE TABLE TestCE
(
    Id           INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CurrentDateTime  DATETIME
)
GO

INSERT dbo.TestCE(CURRENTDATETIME)
SELECT GETDATE()
UNION ALL SELECT '2018-04-11 08:44:42.643'
UNION ALL SELECT '2018-04-12 09:49:45.334'
GO

SELECT * FROM TestCE 
--The resultset

1    2018-04-17 16:49:02.813
2    2018-04-11 08:44:42.643
3    2018-04-12 09:49:45.333

But when I run the following queries, don't get any result:

SELECT * FROM TESTCE 
  WHERE CURRENTDATETIME = CONVERT(DATETIME2, '2018-04-12 09:49:45.333') 
GO

SELECT * FROM TESTCE 
  WHERE CURRENTDATETIME = CONVERT(DATETIME2, '2018-04-11 08:44:42.643') 
GO

SELECT * FROM TESTCE 
  WHERE CURRENTDATETIME = CONVERT(DATETIME2, '2018-04-17 16:49:02.813') 

I have also tried with QueryTraceOn option for backward CE but with no success:

SELECT * FROM TESTCE 
  WHERE CURRENTDATETIME = CONVERT(DATETIME2, '2018-04-12 09:49:45.333') 
  OPTION(QUERYTRACEON 9481);
GO

SELECT * FROM TESTCE 
  WHERE CURRENTDATETIME = CONVERT(DATETIME2, '2018-04-11 08:44:42.643') 
  OPTION(QUERYTRACEON 9481);
GO

SELECT * FROM TESTCE 
  WHERE CURRENTDATETIME = CONVERT(DATETIME2, '2018-04-17 16:49:02.813') 
  OPTION(QUERYTRACEON 9481);

Also set the following DB option but with no success either:

ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION 
  SET LEGACY_CARDINALITY_ESTIMATION = ON

As soon as I change the compatibility level back to 2008, queries start returning the data as expected.

3

From this KB article:

Starting with SQL Server 2016 and Azure SQL Database, the database engine includes improvements in data type conversions and in several other operations. Most of these improvements offer increased precision when you deal with floating-point types, as well as with classic datetime types. These improvements are all available when you use at least database compatibility level of 130. This means that for some (mostly uncommon) expressions you will see different results for some input values after you upgrade the database to compatibility level 130 or a higher setting.

In your specific example, the comparison still works if:

  • you don't force the conversion to datetime2 (and this is unnecessary since you don't have any more precision in the input anyway);
  • start with a datetime2 column in the first place;
  • convert the input to datetime after converting to datetime2; or,
  • stay with the old compat level.

Otherwise you are trying to make SQL Server forever know that, for example, .333 = .334. The new types were introduced in SQL Server 2008, and were replaced to address exactly this type of imprecision; I guess they feel they have to move on at some point.

As an aside, I don't think the current behavior is 100% correct, but it's what we're stuck with for now.

Further, compatibility level is one way (and not a really good way) to affect the cardinality estimation model, but the reverse is not true. You can't change compatibility level by changing the CE model. This is why you didn't have any success using the query-level trace flag or database configuration option. But you don't have to go back to 100; 120 would probably work as well.

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