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With this model there are certain bulk operations such as BULK INSERT, CREATE INDEX, SELECT INTO, etc... that are not fully logged in the transaction log and therefore do not take as much space in the transaction log.

What is the technical meaning of "Bulk" in the "Bulk-Logged Recovery Model"? I need clarity on what-all is classified as bulk please. Is every bulk insert, create index, select into classified as bulk or does it depend on volume of data involved?

As I understand, the Bulk-Logged Recovery Model doesn't fully log the bulk transactions. Then why is it named like this?

  • Did you got the chance to read Understanding Bulk Logged Recovery Model By MVP Gail Shaw. I am sure you would find lot of your answers their – Shanky Oct 10 '18 at 7:17
  • Interesting viewpoint. I have a feeling that you indeed understand what this recovery model is all about and are just curious about the naming. "Minimally logged but will allow transaction log backup through picking up affected extents from data files when minimally logged operations has occurred recovery model" was probably considered a too long name for this recovery model. ;-). to be honest, I think that they just failed to come up with a good name. – Tibor Karaszi Oct 10 '18 at 14:28
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As I understand, the Bulk-Logged Recovery Model doesn't fully log the bulk transactions. Then why is it named like this?

Without an answer from the folks that actually named this recovery model, we can only guess about the name. But it seems to me like "bulk-logged" means something similar to "buying in bulk."

You can buy a single steak every day at the grocery store for one price. OR, you could buy in bulk, and get a whole month's supply of steaks for significantly cheaper (per steak).

Similarly, you can log every single action and its data (Full Recovery model). OR, you can log the transactions in bulk (just the page allocations), for significant "savings" in how much information needs to be written to the transaction log.

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