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I am looking at the prospect of upgrading from oracle 11G to 12C, and I am looking at the cdb vs non-cdb models, and I am having a hard time seeing the benefit of using CDB, without multitenant licensing.

For the most part when I look for information regarding the two, I come up with a lot of forums and blogs saying its the way of the future, non-CDB might be desupported in some future version, its the next big thing for oracle, as reasons to make the switch. Those all sound like marketing driven reasons to move from non-CDB to CDB, but I am not seeing much information about real benefits of going to a new architecture. Most of the real benefits seem to come when multitenant cdb is an option, but for the time being I have to assume its not in my case. We have looked at the cost, and I don't see the option being purchased.

My question then is from a DBA perspective: are there any real benefits from moving to a single tenant CDB vs staying with what seems to be a tried and true design of the non-cdb environment?

Edit: man, two weeks and nothing. Does anyone have anything regarding this?

  • I'd also like to know more about this one. From hearsay I 'know' that it's better to pick CBD, as Oracle will discontinue non-CDB at some point, so you save a migration then. Also pricing is the same AFAIK when you have only one DB in the CDB. – Peter Mar 28 '19 at 11:14
  • Peter, yeah pricing is the same if you stick to one pdb for each cdb, but if you do that I don't see a real benefit of moving to the new architecture. – Patrick Mar 29 '19 at 3:14
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Having a single tenant CDB allows you to plug/unplug on upgrades, you can use the clone function and it allows stricter separation of admin users in the CDB and the PDB users.

You find this arguments in multiple articles and presentations of Oracle, all hint to the fact that you also should get used to the new normal.

https://blogs.oracle.com/multitenant/single-tenant-configuration

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