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I read a lot of post about high CPU usage of Mongo but almost all relates to queries.

I just did a fresh install of MongoDB 4. I have no other databases than the default one.

As soon as I start the server, I get a high CPU usage. The usage returns to normal as soon as I stop the server.

Here`s my Process Explorer CPU history:

Process explorer CPU history

The first red dot is when I started the server. The second one is when I stopped the server.

What should I check?

[EDIT] 2019-07-26 14:03 - It's running on Windows Server 2012 R2, 6 core in Google Cloud Compute Engine

Thanks

  • What is the O.S Environment? – Md Haidar Ali Khan Jul 26 at 17:33
  • Windows Server 2012 R2, 6 core running in Google Cloud Compute Engine – vIceBerg Jul 26 at 17:53
  • FYI,You can edit your tag at anytime. – Md Haidar Ali Khan Jul 26 at 18:16
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As per MongoDB Blog documentation here By checking CPU, memory, and disk space metrics you make sure your MongoDB processes have sufficient resources available.

  • CPU - MongoDB will deliver better performance on faster CPUs. When monitoring virtual machines, also monitor the virtual host that the machines run on. Numbers like CPU ready time are of particular importance.
  • Page faults per seconds - Having thousands of page faults per second indicates that your hosts are out of memory.
  • Disk space - NoSQL databases eat up a lot more disk space than you would expect. MongoDB takes up less RAM than a common SQL database, but it’s a real disk space hog. For an optimal MongoDB performance make sure you have lots of disk space available on your hard drive.

As per MongoDB atlas documentation here The input/output operations per second (IOPS) the system can perform. This value is fixed at 30 IOPS per GB for reads and 30 IOPS per GB for writes.

For Example: The M30 instance size has a default storage size of 40GB per instance and a max storage speed of 1200 max IOPS. Increasing the storage size to 100GB per instance increases the max storage speed to ( 30 IOPS / GB * 100 GB) or 3000 IOPS.

SSD persistent disks can achieve greater IOPS and throughput performance on instances with greater numbers of vCPUs. Read SSD persistent disk performance limits for details.

SSD and standard persistent disks can achieve greater throughput performance on instances with greater numbers of vCPUs. Read Network egress caps on write throughputfor details.

For further your info here and here

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    I can't see how, on a fresh install of Mongo, with no databases expect the default ones could result in a need to extend the disk space or anything like that. I have plenty of ram and I have 6 cpus... There's something else wrong – vIceBerg Jul 26 at 19:55

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