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So it's time to upgrade out servers. I'm new in this company and we have SQL Servers from 2008 to 2014. I really don't see a problem upgrading all of them to 2014 because it's really wel documented and it's well known by the comunity. Its support ends in 7/9/2024 right? what are the reasons to upgrade directly to SQL Server 2016?

I could find A lot of websites comparing them but those are not features that we are using nowadays.

I would like to ugraprade directly to 2016 since its suport ends on 7/14/2026 but I'm afraid it has a lot of changes in queries since 2008/2012 (like deprecated features being removed ).

Is SQL Server upgrade advisor a trusty tool to use to make tests like this?

I've in the past upgrades our environment ( different company ) from SQL SERVER 2005/2008 to 2014 without problems.

and since we have quite few databases ( Like less then 10 in every server ), it's safer to backup/restore then into the new environment right? I don't feel confident doing in place upgrades.

And as far as i know, we can't migrate a database directly from SQL Server 2008 (100) to sql server 2016 right ?

closed as too broad by Josh Darnell, Erik Darling, kevinsky, Joe Obbish, LowlyDBA Aug 7 at 18:55

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    Why not upgrade to 2017? – Taryn Aug 7 at 17:55
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    What is the reason not to upgrade to 2016 (although you should really be asking about 2017)? Unless you plan on never upgrading past 2014, then you'll have to face deprecated features eventually. Check the deprecation documentation, use the advisor, thoroughly test your code, and move to 2017. – LowlyDBA Aug 7 at 17:56
  • Thanks guys. I'm on this page right now about deprecated features. Will see the benefits with 2017. – Racer SQL Aug 7 at 18:00
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    Remember that there are also risks for not upgrading all the way to the latest version. What if you hit an issue that's fixed in 2017, but not back-ported to 2016? – David Browne - Microsoft Aug 7 at 18:10
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    General guidance is to upgrade to the latest released version, unless there is some reason not to. But there can be lots of reasons "not to". They may want to run 3rd party software that doesn't support 2017 yet. They may have an internal certification process that hasn't run yet. They may have existing licenses for SQL 2016 without Software Assurance. . . .. – David Browne - Microsoft Aug 7 at 18:37
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Its support ends in 7/9/2024 right?

Extended support ends 7/9/2024. Mainstream support ends 5 years before that, or about a month ago. This means it's now in extended so no more bug fixes, only security patches. I guess it depends on how you look at "supported".

what are the reasons to upgrade directly to SQL Server 2016?

At this point, I'd either look at 2017 or 2019 depending on timelines for implementation for the project on the business side. What are the reasons to NOT upgrade to something in mainstream support?

I'm afraid it has a lot of changes in queries since 2008/2012 (like deprecated features being removed ).

It doesn't really matter if you went to 2014, 2016, 2017, or 2019 at this point. Items have been added to the product and others have changed. You'll need to verify that your app works with it. Granted SQL Server tries very hard to keep backwards compatibility but some things do get completely removed. Generally those things are spelled out at least 2 versions in advance. So if it was deprecated in 2012, then at the least it could be removed in 2016, which still means there was 4+ years to not use said deprecated item. If this is 2008, then it's been 11 years. If something deprecated hasn't changed in 11 years, then I think you should speak with that vendor instead.

There are various tools to do testing, if you so wish, but if this is for a 3rd party application the best bet is to talk with them. If this is a home-grown or you're the 3rd party provider then you should be doing your own internal testing as there may be new features which work better for parts of your software.

Is SQL Server upgrade advisor a trusty tool to use to make tests like this?

Will it do everything and find every little thing? No. Is it going to find most major issues? Yes.

Data Migration Assistant: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=53595

[...] it's safer to backup/restore then into the new environment right?

That's going to depend per application and database. There may be downtime and other requirements but I'd definitely, at a minimum, restore the database from a backup to test the migration.

  • Thanks sean. I'm already downloading SQL Server 2017 dev edition and I will try to test stuff here and there. – Racer SQL Aug 7 at 19:21

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