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Every ~8 hours, I receive the error below in my Windows Cluster events. During this same time connections to SQL server are being lost. I am struggling to find any resources that help determine what the issue is and possible solutions.

One thing I have noticed is that the Windows Cluster Name is the same as the AG name and I wonder if there is a conflict.

Cluster resource 'SQLCluster' of type 'SQL Server Availability Group' in clustered role 'SQLCluster' failed.

The Cluster service failed to bring clustered role 'SQLCluster' completely online or offline. One or more resources may be in a failed state. This may impact the availability of the clustered role.

The error is only generated for the current primary node.

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One thing I have noticed is that the Windows Cluster Name is the same as the AG name and I wonder if there is a conflict.

There is no issue there. If there were, it wouldn't come online in the first place. The AG name is a cluster resource which doesn't have anything external associated with it, it's entirely internal to the cluster. The cluster name is backed by the CNO which does have a computer AD object (if AD integrated) and DNS entries associated with it.

Cluster resource 'SQLCluster' of type 'SQL Server Availability Group' in clustered role 'SQLCluster' failed.

I am struggling to find any resources that help determine what the issue is and possible solutions.

  1. Look at the cluster log. This can be achieved via powershell, get-clusterlog, and I'd add -uselocaltime so that the time values aren't in UTC... unless that's your thing.
  2. Look at the SQL Server errorlog.

Every ~8 hours, I receive the error below in my Windows Cluster events. During this same time connections to SQL server are being lost.

If it's every 8 hours, there is something in your environment which is triggered on a fairly accurate schedule. If this is a VM, this can be things like backups, migrations, etc., which will not be visible inside of the guest.

You'll need to look at the above-mentioned logs in order to diagnose what is happening, or at least get the next bread crumb.

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