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I remember there was some credit system in 2019 in AWS Sql Server, which regulated how many times you could connect per second (minute?), based on how much you paid. Over night, during idle, you would accumulate connections and your connection-heavy process would run in the morning fine for some time. And then it would encounter this error

System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException (0x80131904): Execution Timeout Expired. The timeout period elapsed prior to completion of the operation or the server is not responding....

This is due you running out of credits while your application still needs more connections than AWS instance can give you.

I found this page https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/storage/maximizing-microsoft-sql-server-performance-with-amazon-ebs/

But this is from 2019. I don't see any new info on these credits. Is this still the thing in AWS Sql Server? And were can I see the settings/parameters in the AWS console?

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I don't see any new info on these credits. Is this still the thing in AWS Sql Server?

I've never heard of a credit system for connections on AWS. What they normally do with credits is use them to limit the performance of the hardware your server is on. When you run out of credits, your server's disk speed will slowdown significantly to a baseline speed, such as how the document you linked discusses in regards to IOPs.

And were can I see the settings/parameters in the AWS console?

That would be best answered by an AWS Support Rep.

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  • I clearly remember that connections were timed out when we ran out of accumulated credits. Could this be related to IOPs? probably.
    – T.S.
    Jul 28, 2023 at 19:15
  • @T.S. "Could this be related to IOPs? probably." - No, that would be very unusual. Less IOPs just means slower read and write times on the disk. Queries basically take longer, but they'll eventually complete. A login timeout sounds like a specific issue like poor connectivity or a configuration issue or something similar.
    – J.D.
    Jul 29, 2023 at 2:50

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