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Here's the problem we are having: I have Job Notifications turned on for several SQL Server nightly Jobs. Sometimes those email notifications come to me when I'm out of office, and my Outlook is set up to automatically send "out of office" emails. The problem is that the "out of office" emails are going to my coworker. Similarly, when my stored procedures sends users a warning email, if the users have "out of office" emails turned on, my co-worker gets all those "out of office" emails.

My coworker is annoyed.

My co-worker set up our SQL Server database mail. He set up an account called 'Internal DBAs' and then put his own email as the email for the 'Internal DBAs' account. The "Internal DBAs" account is the only database mail account currently set up on the SQL Server. I'm not very familiar with SQL Server database mail, but I'm guessing that this is why my coworker is getting all the "out of office" emails.

I would think that the solution would be to substitute my coworker's email address with an un-monitored email address to use as the database mail account. That way no one gets the "out of office" emails.

We didn't have this problem with our old SQL Server. I don't know why he set things up this way, but I think my coworker thinks that he needs to have his email address as the email to use for the database mail account. Is there a good reason to use a DBA's personal email address as the address for the database mail account? Does anyone have a sense of what is standard practice? Or am I mistaking the cause of the problem?

Any illuminating thoughts would be most appreciated!

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My coworker is annoyed.
My co-worker set up our SQL Server database mail. He set up an account called 'Internal DBAs' and then put his own email as the email for the 'Internal DBAs' account.

And then they're surprised that they get lots of emails?
Really?

Is there a good reason to use a DBA's personal email address as the address for the database mail account?

Quite the opposite.

What if they had left the company (and their email account destroyed)? What would happen then?

I would never recommend using individual email addresses for systemic purposes.
Always create dedicated mailboxes for such purposes and give access to them to the entire DBA team.

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  • Thank you Phill W.! That's the kind of information I was looking for. Maybe I was missing something. It will be really helpful for me to be able to go back to my co-worker and explain that there's no advantage to his own email being in that box. (And it's not just little me saying so.) Thank you!!! Oct 18, 2023 at 15:36
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You can exclude from the OutOfOffice rule the email coming from your sql server. Configuring outlook is out of the scope of this forum so please try with this external link: https://www.extendoffice.com/documents/outlook/5306-outlook-out-of-office-exclude-address.html#a1

Otherwise, the best option is to send alarm emails to a shared mailbox so anyone in service can handle them.

If your want to use personal email addresses and if you work on shifts, you could eventually set the operators with the proper pager.

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  • Thanks for your reply. We know how to set rules in Outlook, but it seems like it would be better to stop the problem at the source - ie, to not have the emails come from any one to a personal developer's email. Is there any reason to set up the database mail account with a real email address that gets checked by a real staff person? Is there any downside to having the database mail email address be for an unmonitored email? Oct 17, 2023 at 16:37
  • Sorry. I re-read your reply more closely and think I understand better. I think you are saying that I could tell Outlook to never send an out of office reply if the email I get comes from SQL Server. I could definitely apply that rule to my own Outlook. For this solution to work, we would have to apply that rule to the Outlook boxes of all staff. That might be problematic. So, I still have the question about whether we need to use a real person's email address when setting up database mail, but I also appreciate you giving me a solution that will work for part of the problem. :-) Thanks! Oct 17, 2023 at 16:48
  • the answer is "Otherwise, the best option is to send alarm emails to a shared mailbox so anyone in service can handle them."
    – MBuschi
    Oct 18, 2023 at 7:50
  • Thanks MBuschi. That's what I suspected, but I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing anything. Oct 18, 2023 at 15:34

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