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I have an Access Database that is shared with my company on a network drive..When I Click on the drive and copy and paste it to my desktop and make changes to it the database that is on the drive also gets the changes but I dont want to change that one yet.

When I change data in the database on my desktop it changes the database on the drive? I have tried changing the name, I have checked the source file, and I also checked to see if the program had some kind of link but still can not find any solution?

  • So you want me to look at the tables and see if they are linked to the other database? – Z1nkStar Mar 12 '14 at 20:51
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When you copy the complete access database to another place and modify it there, then the data in your source database would not be changed.

The most likely explanation is, that not all data is stored in the database you copied, but instead some of the tables are links to another access database or even ODBC connections to a completely different database system.

You can usually quickly recognize those tables by having another symbol in your tables list.

  • Do you think I should look at the tables and see if they link to the network drive? – Z1nkStar Mar 12 '14 at 20:54
  • Not to the drive, to another database. – Sascha Rambeaud Mar 13 '14 at 8:56
  • Is it okay if I send you JPG images of what im dealing with?? – Z1nkStar Mar 13 '14 at 13:05
  • I don't even know if that's possible on stackexchange (pretty new here). I wouldn't have problems with that, though. – Sascha Rambeaud Mar 13 '14 at 13:41
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    Au contraire, mon ami. (Ok, that's how far my french goes ;)) - Firstly, you're looking at the properties of your file. To find if tables are linked, you need to OPEN your database and look at the listed tables. Secondly, in this case, the .._BE.. file STRONGLY suggests that the databse is split into a frontend and a backend, with the data in the frontend linked to the backend. However, if you copy both files, the links in the frontend database will still point to the backend on your shared drive and NOT to your copy. – Sascha Rambeaud Mar 14 '14 at 9:03

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