3

I'm attempting to create a stored procedure that can be used as a proxy for creating databases where users do not have rights for creating databases. See Restricting Database Access/Functions to User Groups? for more info

When I attempt to execute the stored proc, SQL Server generates a security error:

Msg 262, Level 14, State 1, Line 1
CREATE DATABASE permission denied in database 'master'.

This is the code:

CREATE LOGIN DatabaseCreator WITH PASSWORD='Pa$$w0rd'; /* REPLACE WITH A SECURE PASSWORD! */
GO
CREATE USER DatabaseCreator FOR LOGIN DatabaseCreator;
GO
EXEC sys.sp_addsrvrolemember 'DatabaseCreator','sysadmin';
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.CreateDatabase
(
    @DatabaseName SYSNAME
)
WITH EXECUTE AS 'DatabaseCreator'
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    DECLARE @cmd NVARCHAR(max);
    IF COALESCE(@DatabaseName,'') <> ''
    BEGIN
        SET @cmd = 'CREATE DATABASE ' + QUOTENAME(@DatabaseName) + ';' 
        EXEC sys.sp_executesql @cmd;
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SET @cmd = 'INVALID DATABASE NAME';
        RAISERROR (@cmd, 0, 1);
    END
END;
GO
EXEC master.dbo.CreateDatabase 'MyDatabaseName';

msg 262 appears to be a generic Permission Denied message. Since DatabaseCreator has sysadmin privileges, this should not be happening. Unless I'm missing something.

  • The login and the user are created in the MASTER or in another DB – Serpiton May 9 '14 at 21:35
5

The EXECUTE AS clause of CREATE PROCEDURE can only be used to impersonate a user (not a login) and the scope of impersonation is restricted to the current database. The sysadmin permission is associated with the login, not the user, so you receive a permissions error.

The correct way to grant CREATE DATABASE here is to sign the procedure. The process is a little involved because we want to sign the procedure to grant a server-level permission, but each step of the process is reasonably simple:

First, create a certificate and login in master with the CREATE ANY DATABASE permission. The certificate will later be copied to the target database to allow procedure signing.

USE master;
GO
CREATE CERTIFICATE CreateDatabaseCert
   ENCRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'password'
   WITH SUBJECT = 'Create Database',
   START_DATE = '20140101',
   EXPIRY_DATE = '20141231';
GO
CREATE LOGIN CreateDatabaseLogin 
FROM CERTIFICATE CreateDatabaseCert;
GO
DENY CONNECT SQL TO CreateDatabaseLogin;
GO
GRANT CREATE ANY DATABASE 
TO CreateDatabaseLogin;

We now need to copy the certificate to the database where the procedure will be run. There are a couple of ways to do this, but the most compatible is to read and write the certificate via a file. This next step writes the certificate:

BACKUP CERTIFICATE CreateDatabaseCert 
TO FILE = 'C:\Temp\CreateDatabase.cer'
WITH PRIVATE KEY 
(
    FILE = 'C:\Temp\CreateDatabase.pvk',
    ENCRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'password',
    DECRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'password'
);

Now we switch to the target database, restore the certificate, and delete the temporary files:

USE Sandpit;
GO
CREATE CERTIFICATE CreateDatabaseCert
FROM FILE = 'C:\Temp\CreateDatabase.cer'
WITH PRIVATE KEY
(
    FILE = 'C:\Temp\CreateDatabase.pvk',
    ENCRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'password',
    DECRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'password'
);
GO
--EXECUTE sys.sp_configure 'show advanced options', 1;
--RECONFIGURE;
--EXECUTE sys.sp_configure 'xp_cmdshell', 1;
--RECONFIGURE;
EXECUTE sys.xp_cmdshell 'ERASE C:\Temp\CreateDatabase.*';

Now create the procedure, and sign it using the certificate:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.CreateDatabase
(
    @DatabaseName SYSNAME
)
WITH EXECUTE AS CALLER
AS
BEGIN

    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    DECLARE @cmd NVARCHAR(max);
    IF COALESCE(@DatabaseName,'') <> ''
    BEGIN
        SET @cmd = 'CREATE DATABASE ' + QUOTENAME(@DatabaseName) + ';' 
        EXEC sys.sp_executesql @cmd;
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SET @cmd = 'INVALID DATABASE NAME';
        RAISERROR (@cmd, 0, 1);
    END
END;
GO
ADD SIGNATURE TO dbo.CreateDatabase
BY CERTIFICATE CreateDatabaseCert
WITH PASSWORD = 'password';

To test this works, we create a new login and user with permissions to execute the procedure only:

CREATE LOGIN test WITH PASSWORD = 'password';
CREATE USER test FROM LOGIN test;
GRANT EXECUTE ON dbo.CreateDatabase TO test;

The test itself:

EXECUTE AS LOGIN = 'test';
EXECUTE dbo.CreateDatabase @DatabaseName = 'NewDB';
REVERT;

The database is created successfully. To clean up, run the following:

DROP DATABASE NewDB;
DROP USER test;
DROP LOGIN test;
DROP PROCEDURE dbo.CreateDatabase;
DROP CERTIFICATE CreateDatabaseCert;
GO
USE master;
DROP LOGIN CreateDatabaseLogin;
DROP CERTIFICATE CreateDatabaseCert;

For more information on permissions, see Erland Sommarskog's excellent article.

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