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I have a mdb file with lots of OBDC linked tables that are linked to the tables in SQL server elsewhere. I can not see any information on how they are "linked". It is a little scary not knowing whether an accidental key press will effect the live database.

If the SQL server table is modified will it be automatically reflected in the table and when? If I edit the linked Access table will it be reflected in the SQL server table? (Trusted_Connection=YES any significance?)

  • Pieter's answer is correct. If, in addition, you want to know how to protect the SQL Server data from the casual Access user, I suggest you look into SQL Server DBA tools for regulating access by certain users to read-only. My memory is hazy on this score, so I don't want to guess at an answer. – Walter Mitty Sep 5 '14 at 10:51
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  1. If the SQL server table is modified will it be automatically reflected in the [linked] table and when? Yes, on next refresh or requery.
  2. If I edit the linked Access table will it be reflected in the SQL server table?
    Yes; as before, these updates will be visible on the other end on next refresh or requery.
  3. Trusted Connection only controls how the connection is made to SQL Server, not behaviour after a connection is made.

The key concept here is that linked SQL Server tables are truly linked to ACCESS, not copied. If you desire a private copy of the data, copy the tables down instead of linking them.

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You can see the information how SQL tables are linked. Keep the mouse pointer on the link table. You can see all the information like

  • DSN = (Data Source Name) Name of the connection
  • UID = UserID APP = Applicaton
  • DATABASE = name of the database in which the linked table is available
  • NETWORK = SQL Server network protocol
  • ADDRESS = Server IP,Port
  • TABLE = dbo.linked_tablename

For rest of your questions @Pietergeerkens has given answers.

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