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MyISAM is the non-transactional storage engine for MySQL. It provides high-speed storage and retrieval, as well as fulltext searching capabilities. In addition, it is the default storage engine type for versions of MySQL prior to 5.5.

1
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No, it's not possible - you need the MYD file, too. The MYI file is only the indexes and does not contain any data. It is like trying to restore the contents of the book High Performance MySQL from …
answered Jul 11 '12 by Aaron Brown
6
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key_buffer_size which will allocate memory for MyISAM to cache indexes. However, unless you have some specific reason for using MyISAM tables you should convert those tables to InnoDB. In this day and … age, there are less than a handful of reasons to use use MyISAM and MyISAM is not good for concurrency, data integrity, or crash recovery. If you switch to InnoDB, the most important setting is …
answered Mar 11 '12 by Aaron Brown
7
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--sort_buffer_size --read_buffer_size --write_buffer_size Next, convert your table to InnoDB. There's almost no good reason to use MyISAM these days. …
answered Jan 22 '12 by Aaron Brown
2
votes
You need to run sync at the OS level to sync the fs cache to disk (assuming a *nix OS).
answered Jul 17 '12 by Aaron Brown
16
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tables... MySQL internally uses the MEMORY storage engine for creating implicit temporary tables. On disk temporary tables use the MyISAM storage engine. Temporary tables are created on disk when … "myisam" to "memory" on tables using "group by" fix this? as explained here No, it won't and it will make it such that your tables are never persisted to disk. Don't do this. …
answered May 10 '12 by Aaron Brown