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2

You can group several privileges into one Role. It is simpler to grant roles rather than dealing with a bunch of privileges. In a multi-tier architecture this might be no so important. You may have a user admin, backup, http - that's it. However, when your database is used by many (human) users distributed over several departments with different ...


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Is there an underlying reason why databases cannot be owned by a secondary principal? I'm not 100% certain of the reason for this restriction, though I suspect it has to do with the ability to impersonate (i.e. become) that SID. There are certain operations that can reach outside of the instance (e.g. to the OS, file system, etc) and the logic is usually ...


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Honestly, sa or a disabled SQL Server account with absolutely minimum permissions is the best choice. As to why? Well, I could write out three or four paragraphs on that, or I can share my favorite article on What account should own the databases and why. A very thorough explanation covering all the bases. Highly recommended. Here's a core excerpt: (...


0

This could be achieved using a stored procedure that queries for the table names, excluding the sensitive ones and then looping them and setting the Grant on each. Also checkout Roles for easily assigning the same Grant to multiple users. https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/roles.html There are better examples at that link but for your use case ...


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