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You could, instead of delete and insert, update the oldest record for a given ticker, with the new data you have for that ticker. If the primary key of your table was the ticker plus a sequence from 1 to 752, you could save the sequence of that new record in the ticker table, so that finding the next one to be updated would be very fast. Your table would ...


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You may have a terminology or other understanding problem with the term “primary key” as identified in Phil w's response. Skipping over that to the operations being taken on rows: Is updating a table by delete+insert better than <anything> No. As well as performance issues caused by taking multiple actions against the same row, and other resource ...


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The first table has 120 columns, and each primary key has one row The "Primary Key", by definition, uniquely identifies each row. I suspect that's not what you mean here. the second table has 5 columns, and each primary key has 1000 rows Then it cannot be the "Primary Key" of the second table. I assume you mean that the second table ...


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