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7 votes
Accepted

When should I inspect the Error Log?

I've had a varied career, but I have never found relevant information in the SQL Server Error Log. I'm happy you've had an easy time with SQL Server :) Under what circumstances should I consider ...
Sean Gallardy's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

How can I prevent SQL Server from logging the starting and stopping of XE sessions to the server log files?

Readers Note: This was done with public symbols from the Microsoft Symbols Server. The errorlog start and stop items are being generated in the XEventController::AlterEventSession and XEventController:...
Sean Gallardy's user avatar
5 votes

When should I inspect the Error Log?

Well darn. It looks like I should be checking that thing more often. Usually, it's just flooded with info telling me that my log backups are working great. If you’d like a free tool that narrows the ...
Erik Darling's user avatar
  • 40.8k
3 votes

When should I inspect the Error Log?

Here's three more cases, in addition to Sean's list: When the instance won't start properly (as vonPryz noted). In similar vein, when a database won't come back online. When a user is encountering ...
J.D.'s user avatar
  • 37.5k
2 votes

When should I inspect the Error Log?

A few small additions to the good answers from Sean Gallardy and J.D.: I've used the SQL Error Log when troubleshooting problems with encrypted connections. In the first ten or twenty seconds after ...
Doug Deden's user avatar
  • 1,770
1 vote
Accepted

A read operation on a large object failed while sending data to the client

I realize this is pretty old, but "with (nolock)" is commonly used even with the dirty read risk. If you end up popping in the DeLorean though, below would help find use. You can wrap in ...
QuilleyPowers's user avatar

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