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25

Your understanding is correct. It does get a little confusing. Kim Tripp (one of the programmers of SQL Server and a integral part of SQLSkills) goes through exactly what you stated in the MCM videos on Snapshot Isolation. Fast fwd to 41:45 in the video to get to the part where she answers your question. If you use ALLOW_SNAPSHOT_ISOLATION make sure you ...


25

It is terrible, that you learned it that way (sorry!). READ UNCOMMITTED let's you read every row, yes. Even those who are currently used in an INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE operation. This is very useful if you need to take a quick look at some Data or in mission critical SELECT-Statements where a block would be very harmful. In fact, you risk your integrity. It ...


22

I use READ_UNCOMMITTED (or NOLOCK) when querying production databases from SSMS but not routinely from application code. This practice (along with a MAXDOP 1 query hint) helps ensure casual queries for data analysis and troubleshooting don't impact the production workload, with the understanding the results might not be correct. Sadly, I see ...


16

Escalation, though Lock escalation under serializable isolation level may occur the same as it does with other isolation levels. Correct indexes can help to avoid lock escalation up to a point Locking many indexes will increase the likelihood of lock escalation; the count is cumulative across objects for a single statement Some quick examples using a ...


15

OK, went back home and tested. Here is the observation. CREATE DATABASE TEST; GO CREATE TABLE TABLE1 ( ID tinyint, Details varchar(10) ); GO INSERT INTO TABLE1 VALUES (1, 'Original'); GO SELECT name, snapshot_isolation_state_desc, is_read_committed_snapshot_on FROM sys.databases WHERE name = 'TEST'; GO First test with both settings ...


14

is because it has to write to cache and then to the TempDb (row version) and then it can return to the caller. No, this is incorrect. It somehow implies that writes in the presence of versioning have higher latency as each write has to touch the disk (for tempdb) which is not true. The write into the tempdb is also a write into 'cache'. The only 'wait' ...


14

A connection from the pool will have the isolation level set by the last client to use that connection. Yes, it really is that scary. The long and the short of it is that if you change the isolation level of a connection you must explicitly set it back to READ COMMITTED before closing. Better is to explicitly declare your required isolation level at the ...


14

What you're looking for is an optimistic isolation level, like Snapshot Isolation, or Read Committed Snapshot Isolation. Code example: USE Crap; CREATE TABLE dbo.users (id INT, username NVARCHAR(40)); INSERT dbo.users ( id, username ) VALUES ( 1, N'Jimbo' ) /*To turn on Snapshot*/ ALTER DATABASE Crap SET ALLOW_SNAPSHOT_ISOLATION ON; /*To turn on RCSI*/ ...


13

What is HOBT lock? A lock protecting a B-tree (index) or the heap data pages in a table that does not have a clustered index. Why would I still get a S lock? This happens on heaps. Example SET NOCOUNT ON; DECLARE @Query nvarchar(max) = N'DECLARE @C INT; SELECT @C = COUNT(*) FROM master.dbo.MSreplication_options'; /*Run once so compilation ...


12

The setting to disable page locking applies per index, so applying this change to the clustered index only affects execution plans that access the data via that index. If there are nonclustered indexes on the table, you may have to disable page locking for them as well. The following script demonstrates this: CREATE TABLE dbo.LockTest ( col1 ...


12

Do I need to make the "unlock" SERIALIZABLE as well? Despite the name, the serializable isolation level does not guarantee transactions will be executed sequentially, or in the order received. Rather, serializable guarantees transactions will have the same persistent effects on the database as if they had executed sequentially, in some undefined order (see ...


12

It's referring to Azure SQL Database which uses RCSI by default. Isolation Level SQL Database default database wide setting is to enable read committed snapshot isolation (RCSI) by having both the READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT and ALLOW_SNAPSHOT_ISOLATION database options set to ON, learn more about isolation levels here. You cannot change the ...


11

TRUNCATE table will take a SCH-M lock on the table. Even at READ UNCOMMITTED level the SELECT query will need to take a SCH-S lock. This won't be possible until the TRUNCATE transaction has ended and the conflicting SCH-M lock has been released.


11

I think the best approach for you would be to actually expose your module to high concurrency and see for yourself. Sometimes UPDLOCK alone is enough, and there is no need for HOLDLOCK. Sometimes sp_getapplock works out very well. I would not make any blanket statement here - sometimes adding one more index, trigger, or indexed view changes the outcome. We ...


11

Just addressing the SERIALIZABLE isolation level aspect. Yes this will work but with deadlock risk. Two transactions will both be able to read the row concurrently. They will not block each other as they will either take an object S lock or index RangeS-S locks dependant on table structure and these locks are compatible. But they will block each other when ...


11

"Where is uncommitted data stored, such that a READ_UNCOMMITTED transaction can read uncommitted data from another transaction?" The new uncommitted record (clustered PK) versions are treated as the "current" version of the record on page. So they can be stored in the buffer pool and/or in the tablespace (e.g. tablename.ibd). Transactions that then need to ...


11

The choice of isolation level is driven by the guarantees your application requires from the database. Full ACID isolation is only provided by serializable isolation; all other isolation levels provide a lesser degree of protection for transactions. Read Committed admits inconsistent results in repeated reads The only guarantee provided by read committed ...


10

Summary: Can I use snapshot isolation for all write transactions? Yes, but depending on usage read committed snapshot might be better. Does snapshot isolation have flaws? Yes. It needs to store row versions of all active transactions, which requires disk/memory. What isolation level is better for readonly transactions? snapshot isolation, or ...


9

In this particular case the addition of a UPDLOCK lock to the SELECT would indeed prevent anomalies. The addition of HOLDLOCK isn't necessary as an update lock is held for the duration of the transaction, but I confess to including it myself as a (possibly bad) habit in the past. Imagine doing something more legitimate than an ID update, some ...


9

Rolando already more or less described the reason why the deadlocks happen. Let me add that PostgreSQL has to take locks on the rows to be updated, in order to maintain consistency. (now() is fixed to the beginning of the transaction, meaning that two concurrent updates will want to update a given row to a different timestamp, which has to be resolved ...


9

I don't think this has anything to do with how UPDATEs are handled by Postgres or MySQL (or Uber's somewhat moot reasons to switch back) Additionally, with the given setup, Postgres will not create a new row version for every update because no index values are being changed. This case is known as a HOT (Heap-Only Tupple) update. See e.g. here, here or here (...


9

There are some tricky scenarios which can result in the same row being read twice from an index, even under the READ COMMITTED isolation level. Your query does not qualify for an allocation order scan, so the storage engine will read the data from the table in the order of the clustered key. For your table, you have the InProgress as the first column of ...


9

I think it's fine in some circumstances, as long as you accept the consequences, and don't have other options. For other options, I'd push people towards using Read Committed Snapshot Isolation (RCSI) for new applications, or SNAPSHOT ISOLATION (SI) for older applications, where you can't easily test the entire code base for race conditions with RCSI. ...


8

In an ideal world you would have two choices, SNAPSHOT and READ COMMITTED SNAPSHOT (RCSI). Make sure you understand the basics of transaction isolation levels before you decide which is appropriate for your workload. Specifically be aware of the different results you may see as a result of moving to RCSI. This sounds like it's not an ideal world as you don'...


8

The difference lies between a query and a transaction. A transaction can contain any number of queries. To illustrate the difference, I set up a small example: CREATE TABLE table_to_be_updated ( id serial PRIMARY KEY, other_column text, column_changing text ); INSERT INTO table_to_be_updated (other_column, column_changing) VALUES ('value', '...


8

Lock hints are orthogonal to isolation level. While they address similar concerns, adding a lock hint does not change the isolation level. Your transaction will still be a 'serializable' transaction. Of course, the lock hint make the query operation itself violate the transaction serializability, but you are looking at a property of the transaction.


8

Your query is reporting the session-level setting of transaction isolation level, which is set to serializable. Using a NOLOCK hint (or its synonym READUNCOMMITTED) overrides the session isolation level for access to the specific object (table in this case) the hint is specified against. So, the transaction is still running under serializable isolation, ...


8

Just to add to the other answer. SQL Server supports two different flavors of READ COMMITTED, legacy locking READ COMMITTED and READ COMMITTED SNAPSHOT. If you've ever built and supported a high-volume OLTP application on locking READ COMMITTED you know why RCSI was introduced (in addition to making it easy to port Oracle applications to SQL Server). ...


8

Read committed should always get the latest revision of the row that was available at the time of executing the SELECT query. Yes, you are correct. Since it's RCSI, it's at a statement level and not a transaction level which would be regular snapshot isolation. But is it guaranteed, when having two independent sessions? Yes, it should be. Does the ...


8

However as long as we continue to rebuild online or reorganize we will retain the 14 bytes per row. Is that correct? This is true. REBUILD WITH (ONLINE = ON) and REORGANIZE will leave the 14 bytes as-is. A normal REBUILD will clear it. If you disable RCSI, the 14 byte version tag will be cleared by any of the three operations you mentioned: REBUILD ...


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