14

I wanted to answer to add another aspect not well discussed above: field of vision. There are wide varieties of roles for developers and some (for example, device driver development, or developing operating system schedulers) require a very narrow field of vision and an ability to delve deeply into a small problem and look at it from a purely technical ...


11

Yes. There is a whole web site devoted to it: Agile Data I'm using it now for a brand new project. Also see: Should you design the database before the application code is written?. My answer there doesn't capture what I do now: 2 week sprints, good enough for that sprint. As per the Agile Data site. I find it a good practice. It focuses on the here and ...


10

I want to start by saying everything I do is SQL Server so those are the examples I give. In general however this applies to any form of code regardless of system. Let's start by breaking this down a bit. Upgrades You have a system and are about to upgrade some or all of it. For example upgrading an instance from SQL Server 2012 to 2014. At this point ...


9

When Codd defined the relational model he defined a set of operators which could be applied to relations. In specifying a relational algebra, much like specification of an integer algebra, we are able to use symbols in place of relations to solve queries. These operators are subject to the same algebraic properties that integer algebra operators (+, -, *, /...


9

As developer, not a full-time DBA, I use Postgres for some of my work. But it is not my focus. I found Postgres very confusing and frustrating when getting started. After a long career using 4D, I was an pro in relational database design and normalization, but a newbie with SQL and "black-box" database engines. Below is a list of the resources that helped me....


8

There is another path, slightly different form the ones listed. Start as a developer, then become a database designer, then become a DBA. This path was more prevalent about thirty years ago, when databases began overtaking file based applications big time, and people with database expertise were few and far between PS: When I was an ex-programmer turned ...


7

I would spend sometime over at the Teradata Developer Exchange, Teradata Questions (currently disabled), and the Teradata Forum. There is a wealth of information to be gleaned from these sites. There is an Express version of Teradata that can be downloaded from here. This will allow you the opportunity to experiment with Teradata on your own computer. The ...


7

I'm rather at the start of my DBA journey, but here are a few of the reasons why people can find this job hard... It's hard because: you have a lot of responsibilities: people can come and go in a company, but for quite a few of them, their most important asset is their data. You're responsible for it and have all powers over it. As the saying goes, with ...


6

General notes First of all, T-SQL and MDX are 2 completely different beasts. SQL is intended to query tabular relational data, while MDX is intended to query multidimensional data. I'll start with addressing your question about common mistakes. In my opinion the most common mistake is to try and apply SQL knowledge to MDX. You really need to get into the ...


6

It shouldn't take long to get up to speed to a reasonable degree if you've used another RDBMS. Read some guidance on PostgreSQL for MySQL users to help you adapt to sequences vs auto_increment, ANSI-standard quoting (though you should be using that in MySQL already), the stricter data type checking, how authentication and roles work, psql's backslash ...


6

Found these http://www.simple-talk.com/community/blogs/lionel/default.aspx http://sqlzoo.net/ https://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=666829


6

Have a look at: http://sqlzoo.net/ This seems to be what you are looking for.


6

Q1: Previously, I have purchased other Microsoft Certification books and have normally got a PDF version, along with the printed book. Is this not the case anymore? Am I missing a disk or something? On the page you linked to, there were 3 options: book, ebook, and book + ebook. You would need to buy the book + ebook option if you wanted both. Q2: The book ...


5

I became a dba at the age of 25. It took me 6 months from the time I started studying to get certified and 2 months later I had a job. I think determination definitely plays a major part. For me it was not hard getting the job. All it took was will power to study and showing that I was capable of learning what ever is put in front of me. I will say that all ...


5

There are two sites which really stand out for learning SQL, especially Oracle (for MySQL see below). Oracle forums. Pay particular attention to the posts of Frank Kulash and Solomon Yakobson (sometimes things of rare beauty) but anyone with a rep of > 20k merits attention. Check the rankings on the forums page. Orafaq forums. Solomon Yakobson (again), ...


5

I recommend reading the following appendix found in a few of Chris Date's more recent books: Two Cheers For Normalization Normalization is far from being a panacea, as we can easily see by considering what its goals are and how well it measures up against them... I must make it clear that I don't want my comments in this section to be seen as ...


5

Being a DBA also means you are proactive instead of reactive. You have to be able to imagine what the future holds and plan accordingly. This involves working hard...once, many, many times, and if you do it right, the reward is a complete lack of name recognition. :-) You also have to have the ability to say "no" to people (bosses included) and ...


4

As someone who considers himself primarily a SysAdmin and secondly an accidental DBA, I think part of it comes down to the amount of knowledge required to stand on your own and do the job, or perhaps more importantly, to understand the job. The old MCDBA certification sums it up quite well I think. It required four exams to be passed, a SysAdmin exam, a ...


4

I know what you feel, I have 3 years working with MySQL, and in my case I always test the DML queries that can modify or break any information on every table/database/Slave-replication. It's always the safest way to test your query before you run it. There's no way to know if your query can put your data information at risk. The only way is knowing your ...


4

I strongly feel you can be successful as a DBA without taking a formal course in relational algebra, just like you can be a successful programmer without taking a formal course in discrete math. The need to take a course in relational algebra would very much depend on your career path/goals. See this question on Programming StackExchange. The OP wanted to ...


3

A query use the index in the column order (UserId first then RoleId). Without an index on RoleId, it will scan the clustered index. Unless there is a where clause with a userId, the engine does not know how to get inside the index whitout scanning all the userId. Because roleId is a FK, best practice suggest to have an index on it. You definetly need it if ...


3

I've been doing Agile development for more than four years, including my SQL Server projects, and I really like it. I think it is important to understand why and when Agile is useful, from the perspective of the whole system, and general purpose Agile-related books such as the following fit the bill: " Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C#", " ...


3

Your question does not relate to database administration, but answering to your question: when buying books from microsoft press, you can select what option to purchase (printed book / ebook / printed + ebook). The prices are different. There is also a downloads section with code examples. In case of any problems with your purchase - you should contact the ...


3

When implementing an ERD as physical database the following mappings apply: An entity becomes a table (set of rows) A relationship becomes a foreign key. Associative (many to many) relationships become a table with a foreign key to each associated table. Generally the ERD shoud be in at least third normal form. A few notes about relationships: The (...


2

The Essence of SQL by David Rozenshtein. Anthony Molinaro, who wrote "The SQL Cookbook" said that it was still the best book on SQL. I bought a used copy of The Essence of SQL for over twice the cover price and haven't regretted it. I checked it out from the library through inter-library loan before I bought it.


2

Most likely, the intention is for you to create a table and a CHECK constraint on the table CREATE TABLE foo ( col1 integer check( col1 between 6 and 36 ) ); And a demonstration that it works SQL> CREATE TABLE foo ( 2 col1 integer check( col1 between 6 and 36 ) 3 ); Table created. SQL> insert into foo values( 5 ); insert into foo values( ...


2

Because there are many ways to obtain the MCSA the 762 is included as a choice for those who have not previously taken it. If you have already taken it then you would need to choose a different exam to obtain your MCSE.


2

Having numbered columns is an anti pattern. Your Game table shows it. The relationship between Game and Player is many-to-many, even though the cardinality is fixed from a game's perspective. Resolve the problem by adding a new table ("Participant"?), with foreign keys to both Game and Player. To see how it helps, try writing a query to count the number of ...


2

You can try to win via SQL if you'll get up on the top of rating. Every SQL exercise solved shall put up you in rating.


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