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These 3 things have nothing to do one with each other. I will give you an introduction and you can search or ask for more specifics separately: MySQL Cluster is the marketing name of what many of us call - to avoid confusions like the one you are currently suffering from - "NDB Cluster" or "MySQL NDB Cluster". It is a synchronous mostly memory-only key-...


4

The MySQL Fabric node itself is not currently redundant but as stated in the MySQL Fabric FAQ: There is currently only a single instance of the MySQL Fabric node. If that process should fail then it can be restarted on that or another machine and the state and routing information read from the existing state store (a MySQL database) or a replicated copy ...


2

MySQL Fabric is implemented as a MySQL Fabric node/process (which performs management functions) and Fabric-aware connectors that are able to route queries and transactions directly to the most appropriate MySQL Server. The MySQL Fabric node stores state and routing information in its State Store (which is a MySQL database). MySQL Cluster is a technology ...


1

In my opinion, Fabric was doomed because it had a single-point-of-failure, namely the 'fabric node'. Otherwise, it was probably considered mature. The replacement: Group Replication (InnoDB Cluster). This has a robust design that seems to have no major holes. Galera Cluster (built into MariaDB and PXC, add-on for Oracle's MySQL) competes head-to-head ...


1

Off the wall... Turn the Procedure into a function. Simply return 0, or something irrelevant. Instead of CALLing the Procedure, invoke the Function this way: SELECT 0 WHERE key = 'A' AND routine(key); The hope is that the sharding will kick in for the first part of the WHERE and send the SELECT only to the desired shard. BTW, it appears that Fabric is ...


1

Use DRBD Replication to enable active-passive MySQL Fabric. I've been using 2 MySQL Fabric to manage my database farms. In any event that the Active Fabric fails, it will automatically switch to the other Fabric Instance using the replicated data in my logical drive. I'm using the following for this setup: DRBD Pacemaker Corosync


1

Just found this question while looking for answers on a related topic. What I've done is to set up the MySQL Fabric controller as a pair of servers with multi-master replication and a daemon that looks for a heartbeat on the first server's mysqlfabric process and restarts it, starting the second server's mysqlfabric in case the first refuses to restart. Why ...


1

I know this is a bit old, but I was looking into setting up some clusters with MySQL Fabric and ran into the same question. The best answer I have found is to use Pacemaker and Corosync. After deciding on that I - luckily - found that the MySQL Utilities Manual already has a section on how to set up exactly that. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql-utilities/1....


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