11

Based on the data that you have provided - there are 67 total pages. Index fragmentation for such a small table would not affect the performance. I would not worry about index fragmentation for the table that you have mentioned. You should update your table statistics so that sql server can generate better query plan. I would start my troubleshooting by ...


6

Network I/O is included in the rpc_completed duration*, so I would expect you'll see improvement in the workload you've described. I enabled TCP/IP on my local SQL Server 2016 instance, and then ran a series of queries through a .NET application that uses an ORM. Here's a comparison of sp_statement_completed and rpc_completed Extended Events targets for ...


4

Indices are bound to fragment in course of usage (time). What matters is if it is affecting the performance. Usually we do not worry about of indices with page_count < 500. (We as in, my team)However,there is not hard and fast rule for a particular page_count.In my previous shop we had set the limit in our Ola script for 1000 page count. But yes with ...


3

Main difference between your Test server and Live server is Concurrency. You haven't done Concurrency Test in your Test server. Concurrency is one of the main reason for Live Site to be slow. What code is written in Front end application like what you have written in connection string . Like connection pool,whether connection is properly close after ...


3

The Process: % Processor Time (Instance - sqlservr.exe) counter takes into account all of your cores. If you divide by the cores you get an answer much similar to what you expected. This TechNet article explains it in far more detail but it uses this calculation to get the number you see: (No of Logical Cores * 100), So this is going to be a calculated ...


2

Is it worth having both int and guid in the table or should I just drop the int entirely? Yes, from the perspective that you can have the identity column be a unique clustered index to take advantage of inserts being append-only to the table, and you can have a nonclustered primary key on your GUID column for both security and uniqueness when locating ...


2

The document control management system needs to perform typical document control management system tasks...for many years (at least two decades). The end of extended support for SQL Server 2014 Service Pack 3 is 7/9/2024. That's 5 years from now. So I think your first step should be to see if / when the vendor intends to get certified on a more modern ...


2

It's important to know what sort of queries you are running. Are they mostly based on the time of the record, or something other field? That will inform what sort of approach you should take here. Maybe your indexes should actually be multi-indexes for example. What's your EXPLAIN statement say for your queries? That's really one of the best ways to see ...


1

Given these queries, is it useful to create a separate (non-clustered) index on just the BillID column? First, note that an index on BillId will include TaxCode. The clustered index key is the row loacator for this table, so every index must contain it. And for non-unique indexes, the clustered index key columns are added as index key columns to make the ...


1

Is it because while decreasing oracle check each column size if it can be decreased? However increasing it, no need to do some checking? Correct. When you decrease the length, Oracle needs to check the values in all rows in the table if any violates the new (reduced) length - it effectively reads all rows in the table. This isn't necessary when you ...


1

If we assume that your column is an INT then, as John's analysis shows, you will see a saving of approximately 80%, at the expense of some extra work joining things back together when reading the values. As you only need values from 0 to 9 you could get a 75% saving by simply redefining the column as a TINYINT which consumes one byte instead of four, ...


1

The canonical answer is to create sample data using both schemas, and profile the queries you'll be doing to see which schema runs faster :-) But I'm guessing you'll actually see equivalent performance. Mongo is pretty fast at querying subdocuments as long as you index the subfields (which you're doing in the first option). So the real way to decide ...


1

It's like most dbms features, if you use it in the right situation it does it's job well, the wrong situation it does it poorly. Pros: Some things just can't be done without it. Typically I have only found this to be for administrative work, and not application code. Some system commands don't allow for parameters to be used as input. So for example if I ...


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