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3

You can't restore a file or filegroup without restoring the PRIMARY filegroup. There are a number of reasons for this given your scenario: Under SIMPLE mode, a Partial Backup always contains the PRIMARY filegroup and all read/write filegroups. You would need to switch to FULL recovery to utilise file/filegroup only backups that can exclude the PRIMARY. If ...


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You should be able to just do the restore. Did you try it? SQL Server will create the mdf and ldf files for you, with the same size they had when the backup was produced. And if the backup came from an express, then it shouldn't be possible to have a more than 10 GB size mdf - and there's no restriction on the ldf. So just try the restore command (possibly ...


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The backup file maintains metadata about the database and files that SQL Server uses during the restore process. Part of that metadata is a listing of data and log files that are in the database, and their respective sizes (as well as other information). If you run RESTORE FILELISTONLY you can see the minimum size required for each data and log file in the ...


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Till full\Differential backup I can understand it is like the snapshot of the database No it does not takes snapshot of the database, it backups up the actual data. Please read the old article written by Paul Randal Understanding SQL Server Backups how T-log Backup works, if we have point in time recovery. I would quote from the article instead of ...


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I think this is the core methodology of database backup and restoration and the whole purpose of taking backup is to be able to restore it to point in time in case of any untoward incident like disk failure, server failure or database crash etc. Lets understand them one by one. Full Backup A full backup, as the name implies, backs up everything. It is the ...


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I have difficulties understanding your question. Perhaps you can clarify or re-prase? Anyhow: A regular log backup will clear the contents of the ldf file (a bit simplified). Using COPY_ONLY for the log backup will not clear the contents. The .tuf file is not related to above. When you restore a log backup, you can specify that you can restore further ...


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First you convert sysdate to a char type, then you convert it back to a date type without specifying the format string, which may or may not work based on the settings of the session running this code. This is completely unnecessary, just use trunc(sysdate) to remove the hours, minutes and seconds. Also, if you return a date type, then the format depends ...


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The size of the backup file is only partly relevant. The restore process first have to create the database files (the "containers" as I like to think of them) and they need to have the same size as when the backup was produced. So you have have a database with only small amount of information, but sitting in large database files. Instant File ...


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No, the database will not drop its own views. But I have seen this many times, for example when developers thought naming their own tables as 'T$...' and views as 'V$...' was a good idea, then they wanted to clean up their schema, but they messed up all the V$ synonyms and views. I would just start the database in upgrade mode and run the below scripts to ...


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Restoring from an SQL dump will be always slow. You can make it faster by: Increasing innodb_buffer_pool_size to size of the old datadir or what available RAM allows. 220G in your config is a good value, so this option not for you. Setting innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit to 0 or 2. Increasing innodb_log_file_size to several GB. 4GB will be OK. Disable ...


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