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5

Here is probably what happened (and this is a pretty common scenario, so don't be discouraged): You backed up the database at some point in time (say, TO DISK = '\\somelocation\file.bak') You made changes to the database You backed up the database again (to the same '\\somelocation\file.bak') Your restored the backup from that file, which contains multiple ...


5

Ask yourself the same question that you ask whenever you need to store any Data: How are you going to use this Data Backup? If you need to get "into" the file and manipulate it (as a Developer might in order to restore part of a dump into a Test database) then something text-based is an obvious choice. If the database is terabytes in size, then a ...


4

No, it's not possible. You can find that info on the BACKUP doc: When you restore a backup created by BACKUP DATABASE (a data backup), the entire backup is restored. Only a log backup can be restored to a specific time or transaction within the backup. This limitation will be clear by Understanding SQL Server Backup Types: A full backup, as the name ...


3

There's no supported way restore a differential backup into a database that has not been restored to the lsn of the differential base. So the only zero data loss recovery plan possible is restore your latest copy_only backup and then restore log backups to roll the database forward. Because, of course, it's not enough to have a backup strategy, you must also ...


3

The ...filename.bak is incorrectly formed message indicates that the backup file is corrupt. Unfortunately, that error message is bad news when you have no other backup files to use. File recovery tools that "undelete" files are imperfect, and partial data loss is a consequence. It would seem that whatever file recovery tools you used were not able ...


1

As already has been answered: No, you can't do point-in-time restore for anything but log backups. I'd just like to add a couple of minor details to the answer and comments already provided: There is a STOPAT option for the RESTORE DATABASE command. But that doesn't allow you to stop at some time (like it does for the RESTORE LOG command). It is only there ...


1

The problem you have because of the different SIDs of sql login on PROD and DEV. You can see the sql users with "missing" SIDs using the following command: exec sp_change_users_login 'report' Or just run sp_helpuser procedure and check for usernames with missing LoginName. The issue can be fixed using the same proc sp_change_users_login : exec ...


1

I was able to get it working by removing the user from the database first and then recreating it. In my case, this login was used in other databases, so I couldn't drop the login. And droping the user didn't work immediately because it also owned some schema. First, I had to find which schema it owned: use [development] go --- See which schemas the user owns:...


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