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6

Each redo log file (and archived redo log file) contains starting SCN and ending SCN. In case it is a last redo, the ending SCN is 0xffffffffffff. nap01:~/oradata/jt10g$ strings redo01.log|head -3 z{|} JT10G Thread 0001, Seq# 0000000004, SCN 0x0000000b05b5-0x0000000bd34f nap01:~/oradata/jt10g$ strings redo02.log|head -3 z{|} JT10G Thread 0001, Seq# ...


6

Asking the database to do the impossible. You changed the TAG, so you created a new initial set of image copies. As diskspace was becoming increasingly tight, I changed the backup script to use a different TAG to try and force a new set of backup images to be create on the new disk. This seemed to work - the new set of backup images were created ...


5

A Cold Backup is making a copy of the files with the database closed. These commands are both for hot backups using RMAN. They are both preferred over cold backups due to their flexibility. The difference between the two commands is whether or not archive logs are backed up. If you need be able to recover to any point between your backups or anytime ...


5

Yes, if you want to prevent a level 1 from being created without a corresponding level 0 being available, then you need to do a crosscheck in the script so RMAN knows that the level 0 is not available. Prior to 10g (or with compatibility < 10.0) Oracle would do a level 0 when a level 1 was done without a level 0. Since you are on 11g, I would expect ...


5

If I correctly understand your question as: "I want to create a standby database and later on take backups on the primary like if there would be no standby present" In this case, you do not need a recovery catalog: quote "An RMAN recovery catalog is required so that backups taken on one database server can be restored to another database server. It is not ...


5

Query this table in order for you to see the platforms to which rman can convert your SYS@EMR> select * from V$DB_TRANSPORTABLE_PLATFORM; PLATFORM_ID PLATFORM_NAME ENDIAN_FORMAT ----------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------...


5

It is not the fault of RMAN if the person using it does not know how to configure the database. With RMAN you can: restore your database to any point in time in the past that your backups cover, not just the actual state where the backup was created restore large databases significantly faster (have fun with impdp on multi terabyte databases - especially ...


4

Figured out the problem. Simply changing the Autobackup Format back to the default '%F' is not viewed as the default. In order to truly have the default value you must use the clear command. CONFIGURE CONTROLFILE AUTOBACKUP FORMAT FOR DEVICE TYPE DISK CLEAR; RMAN behaivor returned to normal. Thanks to all who viewed my question!


4

Issue switch to copy, then crosscheck.


4

If my source database uses SPFILE then do I have create a PFILE from the SPFILE? Yes, you need to create a temporary PFILE to use while duplicating the database. You will later switch the new instance to use the SPFILE. Use CREATE PFILE = 'path/to/pfile' FROM SPFILE; You only need to create directories that are referenced in the PFILE or SPFILE. ...


4

The first thing RMAN does it automatically perform an ALTER SYSTEM ARCHIVE LOG CURRENT to switch logfiles so that the active log at the point the backup was started will be included. It doesn't do this in all backup situations, but this answers your question.


4

In short - yes, there are standard operating procedures for doing all of this with Oracle. You should start by looking into RMAN (Recovery MANager). I have put together a high level overview of RMAN as well as an introduction to Oracle backups for SQL Server DBAs. I suggest watching both of those and then heading over to the Oracle Database Backup and ...


4

Maybe those files are not cataloged by RMAN? I would CATALOG them and then DELETE OBSOLETE once again.


4

The duplicate database ... from active database is designed to work without any existing backup. I would expect Oracle to clean up the archivelogs which were used during the clone process. So I would say this is an unexpected behavior. Try to log a Service Request at Oracle. I cannot recall if I had to clean up archivelogs after a clone processes. Well, I ...


4

In the simplest case, when you restore a database, you tell RMAN to recover it to the most recent point in time by applying all the redo (archived and online) that is available. That will re-apply any statements that were executed during normal database operations including things like dropping tables and deleting data. If you want to restore a database to ...


4

In order to delete them you can do: RMAN>crosscheck archivelog all; RMAN>delete noprompt expired archivelog all; , you can also include the delete input clause when you back them up, and they will be deleted after they have been backed up (it is up to you). You can try and run the command you have shown manually to see what will happen in RMAN (in ...


4

Re Column Indicates Key A unique key identifying this backup set. If you are connected to a recovery catalog, then BS Key is the primary key of the backup set in the catalog. It corresponds to BS_KEY in the RC_BACKUP_SET view. If you are connected in NOCATALOG mode, then BS Key displays the RECID from V$BACKUP_SET. TY The type of backup: backup set (B) ...


4

maybe there aren't any! run this and see if there are any archivelogs older than 5 days list backup of archivelog all;


4

By default, the controlfile is backed up with your data. This is turned on or off by this command: CONFIGURE CONTROLFILE AUTOBACKUP ON; But as a matter of habit, I usually follow my data backups with: backup current controlfile ; backup spfile ; I've had a great deal of trouble using duplicate database on Windows. Typically, I run into NTS permissions ...


4

For The Interested RMAN Beginners The RMAN policies REDUNDANCY and RECOVERY WINDOW are mutually exclusive. This means you can either set one or the other. Redundancy Policy Having set REDUNDANCY 2 will always keep only the last two backups and deleting (or marking obsolete) any other previous backups, that are no longer required to bring back the database ...


3

RMAN only works at the block level & has no idea about the contents of a given block, and therefore cannot do this. You need to use expdp with the query parameter: expdp phil/phil directory=myexportdir dumpfile=yourtable.dmp query=yourtable:\"where groupid in (1,2,3)\" tables=yourtable Obviously, this isn't incremental. There's no really easy way of ...


3

The answer to your question is no, however.... It sounds like a flashback query is what you need. Query the data as of a time when it existed and when it returns the correct data, insert it into the current table. This solution does require space in the UNDO tablespace sufficient to meet your UNDO_RETENTION requirements. It also doesn't use RMAN, but is ...


3

You need to use the catalog command in RMAN to make the file known to the database (don't worry, this does not depend on a recovery catalog!)


3

The "device" in RMAN is a misnomer, it should be really called "storage". The "sbt" (synonym of "sbt_tape") is a misnomer again, as it has NOTHING to do with any tapes, it should be simply called "non-rman". This is just an empty placeholder, to be filled with any "plugin"; the plugin is called by Oracle either the "Media Manager library" or SBT_LIBRARY. ...


3

Oracle Support closed bug 14226856 as "not a bug" and said it will be fixed in 12c.


3

I cannot say for sure why RMAN behaves in this way, but as a workaround you can edit the resulting script within the same workflow in EM before the job is created: ALLOCATE CHANNEL disk1 DEVICE TYPE DISK FORMAT '/disk1/%d_backups/%U'; This will ensure the backups are placed in the destination you specified regardless of RMAN settings in control file saved ...


3

In case you specify COPIES 2 each block is read once and written two times to backupset copies. The two backupset copies are supposed to be bit-to-bit identical. Both copies have the same backupset key (BS_key) in RMAN. You cannot mix tape and disk copies - either both copies go to DEVICE DISK or both to DEVICE SBT.


3

Depending on your requirements and what other backups you have done since then, you could use (from http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/backup.111/b28270/rcmreprt.htm#BRADV89594): REPORT NEED BACKUP RECOVERY WINDOW OF n DAYS Displays objects requiring backup to satisfy a recovery window-based retention policy. REPORT NEED BACKUP REDUNDANCY n Displays ...


3

You may try (requires at least Oracle 10g): RESTORE DATABASE PREVIEW; You'll need at least the archive logs generated during the entire backup operation. A quick demo: C:\Users>rman target / Recovery Manager: Release 12.1.0.1.0 - Production on Wed Jan 8 14:34:28 2014 Copyright (c) 1982, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. ...


3

You're issuing a "recover database" command, which will recover the database as far as possible. If that includes the archivelogs/redo logs which contain your "truncate" command, then this will also be re-played and the table truncated again. Try doing the restore on it's own, or recovering to a specific time using RECOVER UNTIL... then opening the DB read-...


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