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8

You shouldn't think about permissions in the sense that you have to own something to make changes to it. All you need to create an object in a schema is the ability to create an object in the database, and authorization on the schema (there are other ways but they are less secure). You also should think about applying the same permissions to n number of ...


5

A Schema's owner is always a User (or Database Role). There may be a Schema with the same name as a User, because in very old versions of SQL Server a User and a Schema were the same thing. So there's still a User called dbo and a Schema called dbo in every database. A Schema's owner is a User who has full control of the schema, and who will be the ...


1

I'm reading your question as "how to detect schema changes in in-coming data and automatically change out-going data to match?" Obviously, you're going to need to examine the meta-data of the in-coming records. Since its JSON this should be easily handled by whatever technology you use to accept these records. Then you'll need a local store holding the meta ...


1

Good design practice is to implement and enforce the rules of the problem domain. So if your rules lead to this design then that's what you've got. Having mutually exclusive values is not uncommon. They can be implemented in different ways. One is as you describe. Another is to use table inheritance. With this you would have tables track, artist and band as ...


1

SQL Server will execute the statements in a batch one at a time, from top to bottom. Each statement will complete before the next is executed. In your case the this means the first SP runs to completion, then the second one starts and runs to completion, then the third starts and runs to completion. There is no circumstance in which anything else can occur. ...


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