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11

Given that you work for a company that is using Enterprise Edition I'm going to assume you aren't touching one of their servers. If you are please don't. As mentioned in the comments this could be a very expensive mistake and if the work you are doing is on any company asset please contact the company's DBA. That's what they are there for. That said, let ...


2

The process does not possess the 'SeSecurityPrivilege' privilege which is required for this operation. That's pretty cut and dry. Even if you're in the Administrators local group (which you should be to run setup) things like group policy can still be going on in the background and locking things down. All of the required permissions are not held by the ...


0

In an ideal world each new install would be on a nice shiny new server but in the real world it depends entirely on your setup, application, clients and timeframe for the upgrade. With the right planning and research, an in place upgrade can be a perfectly sensible option. The key for whichever method you choose is always having a rollback plan. Whether you'...


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I have been doing a ton of migrations at my current job and the one time we tried doing an in place upgrade we ended up losing a days worth of work. This is my normal process when moving from an older system to a new one. IT Creates a new VM with SQL Server configuration (multiple drives for splitting data, temp, log, etc.), usually with the same specs as ...


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The basic trade-off on most systems when doing in-place vs new is that building a new thing requires more time to prepare due to increased complexity, more time (though not necessarily downtime) to execute (especially if you need to ship lots of data everywhere), and more time for testing. The upside? Usually a more accessible fail-back plan (though watch ...


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