11

For those coming here from Google looking for a solution to this (like me), I found the answer here. All you have to do is right click on the section and ta-da, you can Include or Exclude all objects depending on the existing state of the objects. In this case, section means the Delete, Change, and Add parent folders in the schema compare window.


8

Debugging is a highly privileged operation. Therefore, only members of the sysadmin fixed server role are allowed to debug in SQL Server. See How to: Enable Transact-SQL Debugging for details on the requirements. There also several Connect items discussing this and listing some possible scenarios: Debugging without sysadmin permissions While I ...


5

Sure you can, that's what I do with my projects. Have a look: Create a new Project, I use SQL Server Database Project because I generally end up adding more than just scripts. Add items. Scripts in this case. Go the Team Explorer and select GitHub (or TFS if that's what you're going to work with) I'm going to create a new Private Repository. Done! Now ...


4

The checkbox applies to each option "positively" so that e.g. ticking "script database collation" will generate the appropriate statements to alter collation settings. If not ticked, the deployment will ignore those differences by not scripting the changes.


3

As @sp_BlitzErik suggests, this is simpler to do in SQL directly. If it needs to be part of an SSIS package for some reason, write a SQL script to do the job, and put that in the package as an "Execute SQL" task. And yes, this is actually one of those rare times where using a cursor actually makes sense. However, if for some reason you can't use ...


3

You are correct, the only way to "rearrange" the order of the columns is to create a table with the new structure and push the old data into it, drop the old table and then rename the new table (or some variation of that). It requires copying all the data in the table and some drops and renames.


2

Is there any way to prevent this time consuming process? There sure is! Stop caring about column order. If it is that important, be willing to pay the price, or spend more time up front on the design so that you're not re-deploying the same table multiple times before you get the column order "right." SSMS does the exact same thing if you use the table ...


2

I don't speak Portuguese very well but it looks as if it's saying that it can't connect to the datasource. Please verify if your Analysis services service account has access to the data source. Keep in mind that, unless you specify the username and password the processing is done using the Analysis Services service account while when you browse data from ...


2

Disabling Query Optimizer Hot Fixes resolves the problem here. This means I'm using the 2016 cardinality estimator minus any improvements to the Query Optimizer brought on by other service packs and hotfixes? I never quite understood what happens when you disable hotfixes in the 130 compatibility level. Here's the explanation from the KB. Just adds to ...


2

From looking at the stack trace you posted it seems as though the error is raised when Entity Framework tries to convert the results from the query to an instance of your model. Usually, the error you are encountering is raised when there is a problem with the model binding - in your case the ability of your properties to accept a null value. Ensure that ...


2

You have either installed an older version of SSDT/Visual Studio side by side with your 2015 visual studio or you are trying to open a data source view created in a newer version of SSDT/Visual Studio. Some binary data stream is written in the .dsv file and includes the version information. The solution is to install a recent enough version of Visual Studio ...


2

I've only ever seen that code get scripted in two situations: When the "Always re-create database" advanced publish option is checked. That option can be set in multiple ways depending on how your deployment process works. Here it is in the user interface, when you do a one-off publish or save a re-usable ".publish.xml" file: Without using the UI, you ...


1

I would use RAISERROR WITH NOWAIT in the post-deployment script at the start of each block being executed. This way you should be able to see how far the deployment got before getting to the failure point and hopefully have narrowed it down to a particular script. How I tend to structure my SSDT projects is that I have a single post-deployment script and ...


1

You can post on connect with any version and I would encourage you to. These issues aside I think the only sane way to work with ssis is to use biml to write your packages and compile that into ssis. This means you don't need to keep going into the properties of each task ad-infinitum- if you want to see how a task is configured you scroll down in the biml ...


1

The appropriate way to do this with visual studio is to: Install SQL Server Data Tools for Visual Studio. Create a SQL Database project. Use the tools within the project to create and modify your database objects. Use the publish feature to push your changes to the database. Using a DB project allows you to easily leverage source control, and define build ...


1

Turns out I had to run as VS as an administrator. I guess because of the remote nature of the server.


1

Have you looked at a third party tool such as SQL Compare from Redgate? This is designed to compare schemas and ease the process of deploying changes. I don't think SSIS is the most appropriate tool for this task.


1

The DACPAC is just a zip file, so you could UnZip it and parse the model.xml file contained. small extract from one of my dacpacs: <DataSchemaModel FileFormatVersion="1.2" SchemaVersion="2.4" DspName="Microsoft.Data.Tools.Schema.Sql.Sql100DatabaseSchemaProvider" CollationLcid="1033" CollationCaseSensitive="False" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/...


1

Do not fear everyone, I fixed my problem. What I had to do was detach the databases that I needed so that they were no longer being used by SSMS. This got rid of the error I was having and allowed me to add a connection to the data source in visual studio.


1

Short answer, maybe. If being able to open a previously saved .scmp file makes life easier through time savings or consistency, I'd say it's worth saving. With a schema compare window open, there is a cog wheel icon which opens the Schema Compare Options dialog. There are quite a few options under General and Object Types. Some are selected, others are not ...


1

I doubt seriously that the entire deployment happens in one batch and therefore variables wouldn't persist throughout the deploy (but you could test it). What I think makes more sense is to just store any "pre" values in a temp table (maybe a global temp table) and then retrieve them during the post deploy.


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