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As mentioned, if the files doesn't exist, then they are created at startup. So the question is whether to delete them from the old location and lest SQL Server creates new ones? Or to move the files so SQL Server don't have to create new ones? One could argue that one of these would be quicker than the other. If that isn't an issue, then use whichever feels ...


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The best approach is the one you can find on the Moving the tempdb database section of the documentation. Your method is close to the one Microsoft recommends, except by the 2nd and 3rd steps you listed and the reason is: Because tempdb is re-created each time the instance of SQL Server is started, you do not have to physically move the data and log ...


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If you open BOL article sys.database_files (Transact-SQL) you'll find that 268435456 = Log file will grow to a maximum size of 2 TB 2 Tb is the max size of SQL Server database log file, if you need it more than 2Tb you add the second log file. Here you can find Maximum Capacity Specifications for SQL Server that states that 2Tb is the maximum log file ...


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Is there any good practice or specific reason why SQL Server should have the same memory configuration across different replicas? This is definitely not a rule or prerequisite, normally people tend to keep configuration same so that when failover happens and secondary becomes primary should should not face resource crunch and performance should not get ...


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That’s due to fact it (SECONDARY) has to serve same level of work load as PRIMARY. I.e. when PRIMARY is memory intensive for 32GB, and SECONDARY limits to 24GB in the incident when it’s become PRIMARY it could perform same as primary the impact (8GB Memory) could be in various factors Additional connections might not established Existing requests might be ...


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Building on Solomon Rutzy answer, for EF6: using System.Data; using System.Data.Common; namespace project.Data.Models { abstract class ProjectDBContextBase: DbContext { internal ProjectDBContextBase(string nameOrConnectionString) : base(nameOrConnectionString) { this.Database.Connection.StateChange += new ...


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There are three ways to accomplish this. Since you've already mentioned Always Encrypted, I must ask why you would need to give the certificate to developers in the production environment. Without the certificate, the column encryption key can't be decrypted. Second, you can set up column level encryption and drop the key on the certificate or asymmetric ...


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First: There is no distinction, collation-wise, between biblical Hebrew and modern Hebrew. We are just dealing with Hebrew. Second: Regardless of anything else, you want to use the newest set of collations, which are the _100_ series as they have newer / more complete sort weights and linguistic rules than the older series with no version number in the name ...


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It depends on a lot of things. Collation is sorting, comparing, and non-unicode code page. This repo has a good list of options around Hebrew. +---------------------------+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ | Hebrew_BIN | Hebrew, binary sort ...


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A database connection consists of a TCP (or UNIX socket) network connection to the database machine and a server process on the database machine that serves client queries. You can see active connections in the view pg_stat_activity. That is what is limited by max_connections. Do not confuse concurrent users in your application with concurrent database ...


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It is the number of connections. It is not the number of users, as one user can have many connections concurrently and each one counts against max_connections. And you can also have many more users than connections, as long as users are not permanently connected.


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